Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorChaaya, Nicholas
dc.contributor.authorJacques, Angela
dc.contributor.authorBelmer, Arnauld
dc.contributor.authorBeecher, Kate
dc.contributor.authorAli, Syed A
dc.contributor.authorChehrehasa, Fatemeh
dc.contributor.authorBattle, Andrew R
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Luke R
dc.contributor.authorBartlett, Selena E
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-06T04:53:42Z
dc.date.available2019-09-06T04:53:42Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1662-5102en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fncel.2019.00214en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387010
dc.description.abstractContextual fear conditioning is a Pavlovian conditioning paradigm capable of rapidly creating fear memories to contexts, such as rooms or chambers. Contextual fear conditioning protocols have long been utilized to evaluate how fear memories are consolidated, maintained, expressed, recalled, and extinguished within the brain. These studies have identified the lateral portion of the amygdala and the dorsal portion of the hippocampus as essential for contextual fear memory consolidation. The current study was designed to evaluate how two different contextual fear memories alter amygdala and hippocampus microglia, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and phosphorylated cyclic-AMP response element binding (pCREB). We find rats provided with standard contextual fear conditioning to have more microglia and more cells expressing BDNF in the dentate gyrus as compared to a context only control group. Additionally, standard contextual fear conditioning altered microglia morphology to become amoeboid in shape – a common response to central nervous system insult, such as traumatic brain injury, infection, ischemia, and more. The unpaired fear conditioning procedure (whereby non-reinforced and non-overlapping auditory tones were provided at random intervals during conditioning), despite producing equivalent levels of fear as the standard procedure, did not alter microglia, BDNF or pCREB number in any dorsal hippocampus or lateral amygdala brain regions. Despite this, the unpaired fear conditioning protocol produced some alterations in microglia morphology, but less compared to rats provided with standard contextual fear conditioning. Results from this study demonstrate that contextual fear conditioning is capable of producing large alterations to dentate gyrus plasticity and microglia, whereas unpaired fear conditioning only produces minor changes to microglia morphology. These data show, for the first time, that Pavlovian fear conditioning protocols can induce similar responses as trauma, infection or other insults within the central nervous system.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalFrontiers in Cellular Neuroscienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume13en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiochemistry and Cell Biologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1109en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0601en_US
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_US
dc.subject.keywordsNeurosciences & Neurologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordscontextual fear conditioningen_US
dc.titleContextual Fear Conditioning Alter Microglia Number and Morphology in the Rat Dorsal Hippocampusen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationChaaya, N; Jacques, A; Belmer, A; Beecher, K; Ali, SA; Chehrehasa, F; Battle, AR; Johnson, LR; Bartlett, SE, Contextual Fear Conditioning Alter Microglia Number and Morphology in the Rat Dorsal Hippocampus, Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, 2019, 13en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-04-29
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2019-09-06T04:50:06Z
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Chaaya, Jacques, Belmer, Beecher, Ali, Chehrehasa, Battle, Johnson and Bartlett. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorChehrehasa, Fatemeh


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record