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dc.contributor.authorGholami, Mahnaz D
dc.contributor.authorManzhos, Sergei
dc.contributor.authorSonar, Prashant
dc.contributor.authorAyoko, Godwin A
dc.contributor.authorIzake, Emad L
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-08T22:45:53Z
dc.date.available2019-09-08T22:45:53Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0003-2654
dc.identifier.doi10.1039/c9an01055f
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387015
dc.description.abstractA new benzothiazole azo dye [(E)-1-((6-methoxybenzo[d]thiazole-2-yl)diazenyl)naphthalene-2,6-diol] (also known as “BAN”), has been synthesised and used as a chemosensor for the rapid and selective detection of mercury(II) ions in water. The pink coloured chemosensor turns blue when reacted with mercury(II) ions due to the formation of a 2 : 1 coordination complex. The complex formation causes a bathochromic shift of the chemosensor's UV absorption peak from 540 to 585 nm and turns on a highly selective fluorescence emission at 425 nm. The change in the optical property of BAN upon complexation with mercury(II) was confirmed by ab initio calculations. The new chemosensor was used to quantify mercury(II) ions in water by fluorescence spectroscopy down to 5 × 10−8 M (10 ppb). The limit of detection (LOD) of Hg2+ was 9.45 nM (1.8 ppb) which satisfies the maximum allowable Hg2+ concentration in drinking water that is set by the WHO. The BAN–Hg(II) complex was used for the determination of cysteine (Cys) in aqueous solution by UV-Vis spectroscopy down to 1 × 10−7 M. The thiol-containing amino acid preferentially coordinates the mercury ions of the BAN–Hg(II) complex. This causes dissociation of the blue-coloured complex and the liberation of the pink-coloured BAN dye. The colour change of the BAN–Hg(II) complex from blue to pink was selective to the Cys biothiol while other non-thiol containing amino acids did not cause a colour change. For the in-field application, filter paper strips were loaded with the BAN–Hg(II) complex and used as a disposable sensor for the detection of cysteine (Cys) by the naked eye. Therefore, the BAN chemosensor offers a sensitive, and rapid tool for the detection of mercury(II) in water. In addition, the BAN–Hg(II) complex can be used as a simple and selective chemosensor of the screening of purified biothiols, such cysetine, homocysteine and glutathione in biology research and pharmaceutical/food industries.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRoyal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom4908
dc.relation.ispartofpageto4916
dc.relation.ispartofissue16
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAnalyst
dc.relation.ispartofvolume144
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAnalytical Chemistry
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOther Chemical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0301
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0399
dc.titleDual chemosensor for the rapid detection of mercury(ii) pollution and biothiols
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationGholami, MD; Manzhos, S; Sonar, P; Ayoko, GA; Izake, EL, Dual chemosensor for the rapid detection of mercury(ii) pollution and biothiols, Analyst, 2019, 144 (16), pp. 4908-4916
dc.date.updated2019-09-08T22:40:56Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Royal Society of Chemistry. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorSonar, Prashant


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