Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCarter, Hannah E
dc.contributor.authorSchofield, Deborah J
dc.contributor.authorShrestha, Rupendra
dc.contributor.authorVeerman, Lennert
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-09T00:37:51Z
dc.date.available2019-09-09T00:37:51Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0220209
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387038
dc.description.abstractObjective: To estimate the productivity impacts of a policy intervention on the prevention of premature mortality due to obesity. Methods: A simulation model of the Australian population over the period from 2003 to 2030 was developed to estimate productivity gains associated with premature deaths averted due to an obesity prevention intervention that applied a 10% tax on unhealthy foods. Outcome measures were the total working years gained, and the present value of lifetime income (PVLI) gained. Impacts were modelled over the period from 2003 to 2030. Costs are reported in 2018 Australian dollars and a 3% discount rate was applied to all future benefits. Results: Premature deaths averted due to a junk food tax accounted for over 8,000 additional working years and a $307 million increase in PVLI. Deaths averted in men between the ages of 40 to 59, and deaths averted from ischaemic heart disease, were responsible for the largest gains. Conclusions: The productivity gains associated with a junk food tax are substantial, accounting for almost twice the value of the estimated savings to the health care system. The results we have presented provide evidence that the adoption of a societal perspective, when compared to a health sector perspective, provides a more comprehensive estimate of the cost-effectiveness of a junk food tax.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome0220209
dc.relation.ispartofissue7
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPLoS One
dc.relation.ispartofvolume14
dc.subject.fieldofresearchApplied Economics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1402
dc.titleThe productivity gains associated with a junk food tax and their impact on cost-effectiveness.
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationCarter, HE; Schofield, DJ; Shrestha, R; Veerman, L, The productivity gains associated with a junk food tax and their impact on cost-effectiveness., PLoS One, 2019, 14 (7), pp. e0220209-
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-07-10
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2019-09-09T00:35:21Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Carter et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorVeerman, Lennert L.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record