Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMukaetova-Ladinska, Elizabeta B
dc.contributor.authorCosker, Glynis
dc.contributor.authorChan, Mahathir
dc.contributor.authorCoppock, Michael
dc.contributor.authorScully, Ann
dc.contributor.authorKim, Seon-Young
dc.contributor.authorKim, Sung-Wan
dc.contributor.authorMcNally, Richard JQ
dc.contributor.authorTeodorczuk, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-09T03:03:13Z
dc.date.available2019-09-09T03:03:13Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn2308-3417
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/geriatrics4010006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387061
dc.description.abstractOlder people with delirium occupy more than one third of acute medical beds and require increased medical attention, as care at present is suboptimal. In addition, since delirium is undetected, it should form a target for teaching in wards. Moreover, as people with delirium are largely dependent on daily interactions and care by inpatients professional staff, it is important to address stigmatisation of these vulnerable patients. This is especially important as previous studies have shown that negative staff attitudes towards these patients undermine good care. This single center cross-sectional study was designed to determine the extent of institutional stigma among health professionals involved in the care of people with delirium. For this, professional staff working on medical wards and in communities were approached to fill in a questionnaire containing the adapted Delirium Stigma Scale and the EuroQol five dimensions (EQ-5D-5L) questionnaire. Additional demographic information concerning their education and professional and personal experience with delirium was also collected. The characteristics associated with stigma were determined from the sample. The findings of our study provide an insight into the high level of stigmatisation of delirium patients among professionals (mean 11.66/18 points). This was not related to professionals' own experiences of delirium, their educational and professional backgrounds, or them having received formal delirium education. However, working closely with people with delirium seems to have a positive impact on the de-stigmatisation of this population among health professionals. Our findings that attitudes are not influenced by formal delirium teaching need to be incorporated into the design of interprofessional educational interventions. Accordingly, we advocate more direct patient-oriented and care delivered teaching interventions.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom6-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto6-14
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalGeriatrics
dc.relation.ispartofvolume4
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsGeriatrics & Gerontology
dc.subject.keywordsdelirium
dc.subject.keywordsstigma
dc.titleDelirium Stigma Among Healthcare Staff
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationMukaetova-Ladinska, EB; Cosker, G; Chan, M; Coppock, M; Scully, A; Kim, S-Y; Kim, S-W; McNally, RJQ; Teodorczuk, A, Delirium Stigma Among Healthcare Staff, Geriatrics, 2019, 4 (1), pp. 6-1 - 6-14
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-12-23
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2019-09-09T02:59:13Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorTeodorczuk, Andrew


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record