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dc.contributor.advisorLi, Minglin
dc.contributor.authorZhai, ChunPeng
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-11T03:51:41Z
dc.date.available2019-09-11T03:51:41Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-29
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/2478
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387208
dc.description.abstractFor English-language students, the dominant preference is to have native English- speaking teachers (NESTs). This is because NESTs are perceived as the ideal teachers for learning English given that it is their first language. NESTs have the “gold standard” of pronunciation and grammatical correctness, so they are perceived to be more qualified than non-native English-speaking teachers (NNESTs). On the other hand, Asian Non- Native English-speaking teachers (ANNESTs) tend to be regarded as deficient speakers with poor pronunciation and lack of knowledge of western culture, even though ANNESTs have been found to be competent at grammar and test-centered training (Walkinshaw & Oanh, 2014). To examine whether this is the case in Australia, this study aims to investigate the attitudes of English as an Additional Language (EAL) students towards ANNESTs in ELICOS programs, and how ANNESTs reflect on their language teaching practice based on EAL students’ attitudes. For this research, case study research was employed to collect data from EAL students and ANNESTs in an English language school in a city in South East Queensland. In this study, the researcher used a quantitative approach (questionnaire survey) to establish EAL students’ attitudes towards ANNESTs, and a qualitative approach (semi-structured interviews with students and ANNESTs’ respectively) to examine how ANNESTs reflect on their language teaching practice based on EAL students’ attitudes. Quantitative data gathered from the survey was analysed using Excel software to obtain English students’ attitudes towards ANNESTs, and qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis to gain insights into how ANNESTs face challenges and build their identities in Australia. The qualitative and quantitative results were then triangulated to form a complete whole. The findings of this research provide evidence of initial negative attitudes of EAL students towards ANNESTs in the ten-week ELICOS program, followed by positive attitudes towards ANNESTs’ on-going language instruction. Overall, EAL students showed positive attitudes towards ANNESTs regarding their language instruction in the ELICOS program; this positive attitude increased ANNESTs’ self-esteem and enhanced their identity. It was also interesting to note that the pronunciation taught by ANNESTs was evaluated as positive, which contradicted previous studies that have found the accented pronunciation of NNESTs (including ANNESTs) was frowned upon (e.g., Butler, 2007; Goto Butler, 2007; Gu, 2011).
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.subject.keywordsTeaching
dc.subject.keywordsRote learning
dc.subject.keywordsEnglish
dc.subject.keywordsANNEST
dc.titleA case study of students' attitudes towards ANNESTs and ANNESTs' reflections on their language teaching practice
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyArts, Education and Law
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorSubhan, Sophiaan
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (Masters)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramMaster of Arts Research (MARes)
gro.departmentSchool of Hum, Lang & Soc Sc
gro.griffith.authorZhai, ChunPeng


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