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dc.contributor.authorStefanidis, KB
dc.contributor.authorAskew, CD
dc.contributor.authorGreaves, K
dc.contributor.authorSummers, MJ
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-11T06:00:41Z
dc.date.available2019-09-11T06:00:41Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1040-7308en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11065-017-9359-zen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387223
dc.description.abstractCardiovascular disease is associated with increased risk for cognitive decline and dementia, but it is unclear whether this risk varies across disease states or occurs in the absence of symptomatic stroke. To examine the evidence of increased risk for cognitive decline and dementia following non-stroke cardiovascular disease we conducted two independent meta-analyses in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. The first review examined cardiovascular diagnoses (atrial fibrillation, congestive heart failure, periphery artery disease and myocardial infarction) while the second review assessed the impact of atherosclerotic burden (as indicated by degree of stenosis, calcification score, plaque morphology or number of plaques). Studies eligible for review longitudinally assessed risk for clinically significant cognitive decline and/or dementia and excluded stroke and cognitive impairment at baseline. Summary statistics were computed via the inverse variance weighted method, utilising Cox Proportional Hazards data (Hazard Ratios, HR). Both atrial fibrillation (n = 5, HR = 1.26, 95% CI [1.12, 1.43]) and severe atherosclerosis (n = 4, HR = 1.59, 95% CI [1.12, 2.26]) emerged as significant risk factors for cognitive decline and/or dementia. A small set of studies reviewed, insufficient for meta-analysis, examining congestive heart failure, peripheral artery disease and myocardial infarction suggested that these conditions may also be associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline/dementia. In the absence of stroke, patients with atrial fibrillation or generalised atherosclerosis are at heightened risk for cognitive deterioration. Nonetheless, this paper highlights the need for methodologically rigorous and prospective investigation of the relationship between CVD and dementia.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto15en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalNeuropsychology Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume28en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1109en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702en_US
dc.subject.keywordsCardiovascular diseaseen_US
dc.subject.keywordsCognitive declineen_US
dc.subject.keywordsDementiaen_US
dc.subject.keywordsMeta-analysisen_US
dc.titleThe Effect of Non-Stroke Cardiovascular Disease States on Risk for Cognitive Decline and Dementia: A Systematic and Meta-Analytic Reviewen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationStefanidis, KB; Askew, CD; Greaves, K; Summers, MJ, The Effect of Non-Stroke Cardiovascular Disease States on Risk for Cognitive Decline and Dementia: A Systematic and Meta-Analytic Review, Neuropsychology Review, 2018, 28 (1), pp. 1-15en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-08-14
dc.date.updated2019-09-11T04:55:24Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorGreaves, Kim


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