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dc.contributor.advisorFindlay, Elisabeth
dc.contributor.advisorOstling, Susan
dc.contributor.authorGourley, Susan
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-13T01:46:24Z
dc.date.available2019-09-13T01:46:24Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-27
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387299
dc.description.abstractThis doctoral project analyses Eurocentric and anthropocentric ideologies about nature, tracing them back to the eighteenth century invasion and colonisation of Australia. This research informs my series of unmonumental sculptural objects that address environmental issues and concerns in Australia. In these works, I explore the power of the visual metaphor offered by salvaged materials (what some might call ‘rubbish’, a term I unpack), utilising two contrasting techniques. The first involves incorporating the qualities of trompe l'oeil, which I use as a form of mimetic critique. The second involves drawing upon a junk aesthetic that rejects orderly for disorderly, elaborate for informal, whereby I seek to reflect the dynamics of unmonumentality. As detailed in this exegesis, I have adopted a self-reflexive and interpretative approach, mindful of how I belong to a colonising culture. Drawing on decolonising methodologies, my work aims to question colonial history and to challenge dominant ideologies underpinning white Australian attitudes and practices towards the natural terrain. My purpose is to be open to new ways of thinking about the connection to land and self, initiated through the theoretical frameworks of ecological thought and ecofeminism which highlight different narratives and knowledge systems existing within Aboriginal and white Australian culture. I ask how can objects created from salvaged materials question colonial history, challenge dominant ideologies, and engage with cross-cultural narratives, enabling us to rethink the relationship with nature in contemporary Australia?en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.subject.keywordsNatureen_US
dc.subject.keywordsEnvironmental issuesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsSalvaged materialsen_US
dc.subject.keywordsColonial historyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsAustraliaen_US
dc.subject.keywordsCultural narrativesen_US
dc.titleRethinking the Relationship with Nature in Contemporary Australia: Salvaged Materials, Colonial History, and Cross-Cultural Narrativesen_US
dc.typeGriffith thesisen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education and Lawen_US
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorPlatz, William
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)en_US
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Visual Arts (DVA)en_US
gro.departmentQueensland College of Arten_US
gro.griffith.authorGourley, Susan


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