Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBourke, Emily Jane
dc.contributor.authorVeerman, J Lennert
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-13T04:41:58Z
dc.date.available2019-09-13T04:41:58Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn2059-7908en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjgh-2018-000923en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387303
dc.description.abstractbackground Evidence suggests reducing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is important to reducing weight gain and chronic disease risk. Indonesia’s large population is a growing market for sugar-sweetened beverages. Taxation to reduce consumption is of interest, but considered fiscally regressive. Little is known about differential effects between income groups in low-income countries. Methods This modelling study uses a proportional multistate life table to model reduced daily energy intake following a $0.30 per litre tax on sugar-sweetened beverages and subsequent shifts in Body Mass Index (BMI) distribution for income groups in Indonesia. Energy balance equations calculate reduced BMI. Reduced incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, ischaemic heart disease and stroke is determined from the relative risk of the BMI shift and subsequent health-adjusted life years gained calculated. results The tax’s effect was greater for higher income quintiles than lower. Energy intake reduced most in higher income quintiles. Cases of overweight and obesity for women decreased by approximately 15 000 in the lowest income quintile, but 417 000 for the highest. For men, this was 12 000 and 415 000. Over 25 years, 63 000 cases of diabetes were averted in the lowest quintile and 1 487 000 in the highest. Similar magnitudes were observed for stroke and ischaemic heart disease. Tax paid over 25 years was $0.5 billion for the lowest income quintile and $15.1 billion for the highest. Conclusion Sugar-sweetened beverage taxation can help to reduce the number of overweight and obese, and prevent over a million cases of diabetes in Indonesia. Higher income groups would benefit more than lower income groups. The tax would raise $920 million in the first year and $27.3 billion over 25 years.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBMJ PUBLISHING GROUPen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome000923:1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe000923:8en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue6en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMJ Global Healthen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume3en_US
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPublic, Environmental & Occupational Healthen_US
dc.subject.keywordsSWEETENED BEVERAGE CONSUMPTIONen_US
dc.subject.keywordsRISK-FACTORSen_US
dc.titleThe potential impact of taxing sugar drinks on health inequality in Indonesiaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBourke, EJ; Veerman, JL, The potential impact of taxing sugar drinks on health inequality in Indonesia, BMJ Global Health, 2018, 3 (6), pp. e000923:1 - e000923:8en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-10-14
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2019-09-13T04:37:51Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)en_US
gro.rights.copyright© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2018. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorVeerman, Lennert L.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record