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dc.contributor.authorGlendon, AI
dc.contributor.authorPrendergast, S
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-23T23:05:27Z
dc.date.available2019-09-23T23:05:27Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0001-4575
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.aap.2019.07.030
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387370
dc.description.abstractPurpos: Further explore the utility of protection motivation theory (PMT) in developing effective roadside anti-speeding messages. Method: Via an electronic link, 81 participants holding a current Australian driver’s license rated all possible pairs of 18 PMT-derived anti-speeding messages in terms of their perceived effectiveness in reducing speed for themselves, and for drivers in general. Results: While some messages revealed third-person effects (perceived as being more relevant to drivers-in-general than to self-as-driver), others showed reverse third-person effects (perceived as being more relevant to self-as-driver than to drivers-in-general). Compared with messages based on coping appraisal components, those derived from threat appraisal PMT components (perceived severity, counter-rewards, vulnerability) were rated as being more effective, both for participants themselves as driver, and for drivers-in-general. Compared with females, males reported threat appraisal messages as being more effective for reducing speed in themselves (reverse third-person effect). Aggregate scores for the 18 messages derived from this ipsative methodology correlated modestly with those from a normative study using similarly-worded items. Discussion: As jurisdictions globally recognize speeding as a major road safety issue, effective anti-speeding campaigns are essential. Findings added to current knowledge of PMT’s efficacy as a basis for generating effective anti-speeding messages and indicated areas for future research and application.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherUnited Kingdom
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom105254: 1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto105254: 13
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAccident Analysis and Prevention
dc.relation.ispartofvolume132
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTransportation and Freight Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1507
dc.subject.keywordsCoping appraisal
dc.subject.keywordsIpsative methodology
dc.subject.keywordsMessage effectiveness
dc.subject.keywordsProtection motivation theory
dc.subject.keywordsSpeeding behavior
dc.titleRank-ordering anti-speeding messages
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationGlendon, AI; Prendergast, S, Rank-ordering anti-speeding messages, Accident Analysis and Prevention, 2019, 132, pp. 105254: 1-105254: 13
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-07-28
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2019-09-16T01:15:21Z
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence, which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorGlendon, Ian I.
gro.griffith.authorPrendergast, Samantha


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