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dc.contributor.authorDoualla, Marie
dc.contributor.authorAminde, Jeannine
dc.contributor.authorAminde, Leopold Ndemnge
dc.contributor.authorLekpa, Fernando Kemta
dc.contributor.authorKwedi, Felix Mangan
dc.contributor.authorYenshu, Emmanuel Vubo
dc.contributor.authorChichom, Alain Mefire
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-18T00:02:13Z
dc.date.available2019-09-18T00:02:13Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1471-2474
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12891-019-2403-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387451
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Very little is known about the burden of chronic low back pain in Africa. This study aimed at assessing disability and associated factors in chronic low back patients in Cameroon. METHODS: We carried a hospital-based cross-sectional study including patients suffering from low back pain (LBP) of at least 12 weeks' duration. Disability was assessed using the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ). RMDQ > 4 described persons with dysfunctional levels of disability. Multivariable linear regression was used to investigate factors associated with higher RMDQ scores hence greater disability. Variables investigated included; gender, age, marital status, employment status and type, smoking history, alcohol consumption, income, pain intensity, LBP duration, psychological wellbeing, sleep satisfaction, leg pain, numbness/paresthesia, bowel/bladder dysfunction symptoms (BBDS), body mass index (BMI), and days of work absence. RESULTS: A sample of 136 adults (64% female) with a mean age of 50.6 ± 12.2 years participated in the study. Median duration of LBP was 33 (25th - 75th percentile: 12-81) months. Mean RMDQ score was 12.8 ± 6. In multivariable linear regression, pain intensity (β = 0.07, p = 0.002), longer days of work absence (β = 0.15, p = 0.003) and BBDS (β =2.33, p = 0.029) were associated with greater disability. Factors such as consumption of alcohol (β = - 3.55, p = 0.005) and higher psychological wellbeing scores (β = - 0.10, p = 0.004) significantly contributed to less disability (lower RMDQ scores). Dysfunctional levels of disability were present in 88.1% of patients. CONCLUSION: CLBP is associated with significant disability and this relationship is driven by several factors. Multidisciplinary management strategies especially those targeted to improve pain control, manage BBDS and improve psychological wellbeing could reduce disability and improve quality of life.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd.
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom25:1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto25:11
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
dc.relation.ispartofvolume20
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsOrthopedics
dc.subject.keywordsRheumatology
dc.subject.keywordsChronic low back pain
dc.titleFactors influencing disability in patients with chronic low back pain attending a tertiary hospital in sub-Saharan Africa
dc.typeJournal article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationDoualla, M; Aminde, J; Aminde, LN; Lekpa, FK; Kwedi, FM; Yenshu, EV; Chichom, AM, Factors influencing disability in patients with chronic low back pain attending a tertiary hospital in sub-Saharan Africa, BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 2019, 20 (1), 25:1-25:11
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-01-04
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2019-09-17T03:58:52Z
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s). 2019 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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gro.griffith.authorAminde, Leopold N.


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