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dc.contributor.authorDoran, Frances
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Marie
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Janie
dc.contributor.authorEast, Leah
dc.contributor.authorIrwin, Pauletta
dc.contributor.authorMainey, Lydia
dc.contributor.authorMather, Carey
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorvan de Mortel, Thea
dc.contributor.authorSweet, Linda
dc.contributor.authorYates, Karen
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-19T00:57:49Z
dc.date.available2019-09-19T00:57:49Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1471-5953en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.nepr.2019.08.007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387505
dc.description.abstractNurses and midwives have a professional responsibility to identify and provide effective care to those experiencing domestic violence. Pre-registration preparation may develop this capability. In order to inform curriculum development, this study explored Australian nursing and midwifery students’ attitudes and beliefs about domestic violence. Data were collected between June and October 2017. Descriptive statistics were calculated and comparative analysis performed on independent variables. Thematic analysis was performed on open-ended qualitative responses. Participants included 1076 students from nine Australian universities. The majority were enrolled in nursing programs (88.4%), followed by midwifery (8.6%), and combined nursing/midwifery (2.4%) programs. There was no statistically significant difference in scores by year level across all subscales, suggesting there was no developmental change in beliefs and attitudes toward domestic violence over the course of study. Nursing students held views that were more violence-tolerant than midwifery students. Australian and Chinese-born males were more likely to refute that domestic violence is more common against women. Students had a limited understanding of domestic violence suggesting a critical need to address undergraduate nursing and midwifery curricula.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom102613: 1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto102613: 7en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalNurse Education in Practiceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume40en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursingen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCurriculum and Pedagogyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1110en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1302en_US
dc.subject.keywordsDomestic violenceen_US
dc.subject.keywordsIntimate partner violenceen_US
dc.subject.keywordsNursing and midwiferyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsStudent attitudesen_US
dc.subject.keywordsStudent beliefsen_US
dc.titleAustralian nursing and midwifery student beliefs and attitudes about domestic violence: A multi-site, cross-sectional studyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationDoran, F; Hutchinson, M; Brown, J; East, L; Irwin, P; Mainey, L; Mather, C; Miller, A; van de Mortel, T; Sweet, L; Yates, K, Australian nursing and midwifery student beliefs and attitudes about domestic violence: A multi-site, cross-sectional study., Nurse Education in Practice, 2019, 40, pp. 102613: 1-102613: 7en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-08-18
dc.date.updated2019-09-19T00:26:01Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorvan de Mortel, Thea F.


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