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dc.contributor.authorDodd, N
dc.contributor.authorCarey, M
dc.contributor.authorMansfield, E
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-23T00:29:42Z
dc.date.available2019-09-23T00:29:42Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn2204-2091
dc.identifier.doi10.17061/phrp2751748
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387610
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Higher levels of knowledge relating to colorectal cancer (CRC) are positively associated with CRC screening behaviour.1 However, knowledge of CRC risk factors and screening recommendations is low.1,2 The aim of this study was to examine knowledge of CRC risk factors and CRC screening recommendations among general practice patients aged 18–85 years, and the sociodemographic characteristics associated with knowledge. Methods: This study was conducted in a convenience sample of five regional general practices in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, between December 2015 and March 2017. The practices had six to 18 practitioners and provided private and bulk-billing services. A consecutive sample of patients aged 18–85 years who spoke English and presented for a general practice appointment were invited to participate. Data collection: Consenting patients completed a touchscreen survey in the waiting room. Ethics approval was received from the University of Newcastle Human Research Ethics Committee (H-2014-0198). Measures: A 5-item survey, developed and piloted by the authors, assessed knowledge using a multiple-choice format. Participants were asked to identify which risk factors may increase a person’s chance of developing CRC: smoking, being older than 50, being overweight, not eating enough fibre, and drinking alcohol regularly. Four questions assessed knowledge of CRC screening recommendations for people at average risk of CRC (lay description provided). These included: 1) age to commence screening; 2) type of screening test recommended; 3) how often the faecal occult blood test (FOBT) should be done; and 4) what a positive FOBT result means. Participants could select one response for each of these questions. Correct responses aligned with Royal Australian College of General Practitioners guidelines for preventive activities in general practice.3 Participants reported their age, gender, marital status, employment status and highest level of education. Data analysis: Scores for risk and screening were analysed separately using logistic regression (binary for risk [>1 versus 1] and ordinal for screening) to model the odds of higher scores. All demographics were included in the model. The Brant test assessed the parallel regression assumption, the Pearson’s goodness-of-fit test assessed the binary model, and each model fit adequately. Results: A total of 510 patients (70% of those assessed) were eligible to participate. Of these, 411 patients consented to participate (81% consent rate). Those with missing data were removed, leaving 363 participants in the final analyses. There was no significant difference in gender between consenters and nonconsenters (Χ2(1) 1.29, p = .254). Participant characteristics: More than half the sample was aged 50–74 years (n = 208; 57%), and similar proportions were aged 18–49 (n = 65; 18%), or 75–85 (n = 90; 25%). A total of 219 (60%) participants were female.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSax Institute
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto3
dc.relation.ispartofissue5
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPublic Health Research and Practice
dc.relation.ispartofvolume27
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOncology and Carcinogenesis
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1112
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleKnowledge of colorectal cancer risk factors and screening recommendations: A crosssectional study of regional Australian general practice patients
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationDodd, N; Carey, M; Mansfield, E, Knowledge of colorectal cancer risk factors and screening recommendations: A crosssectional study of regional Australian general practice patients, Public Health Research and Practice, 2017, 27 (5), pp. 1-3
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/
dc.date.updated2019-09-23T00:14:57Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2017 Dodd et al. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International Licence, which allows others to redistribute, adapt and share this work non-commercially provided they attribute the work and any adapted version of it is distributed under the same Creative Commons licence terms.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDodd, Natalie


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