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dc.contributor.authorWest, Lucy
dc.contributor.authorHalvorson, Dan
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T22:38:42Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T22:38:42Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1551-2169en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/15512169.2019.1616298en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387698
dc.description.abstractThis article evaluates a “real-time” simulation where students role-play a United Nations Security Council negotiation over humanitarian intervention in Syria. This simulation is undertaken in a large introductory International Relations (IR) subject. The article argues that in order to achieve deep learning outcomes across the diverse, contemporary cohort of first-year university students, active learning approaches need to be employed that engage differing learning styles and preferences. Deep learning is assessed across the conceptual and metacognitive knowledge domains with two indicators: (1) students’ understanding of IR concepts by applying them beyond the parameters of the Syria case and (2) students’ critical reflection on their moral reasoning elicited by the task. We evaluate 820 students across six cohorts and 21 iterations of the simulation during 2016 and 2017 with a survey instrument and formal reflection assignment. The article finds that the simulation is highly effective at consistently engaging the majority of students’ interest and motivation, while illustrating the acute and sometimes tragic tension between moral and political reasoning in IR. We found that disrupting student’s cognitive structures regarding human rights and justice stimulated not only deeper conceptual understanding but also emotional reactions that were the catalyst for metacognitive reflection.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherInforma UK Limiteden_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto18en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Political Science Educationen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCurriculum and Pedagogyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1302en_US
dc.titleStudent Engagement and Deep Learning in the First-Year International Relations Classroom: Simulating a UN Security Council Debate on the Syrian Crisisen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationWest, L; Halvorson, D, Student Engagement and Deep Learning in the First-Year International Relations Classroom: Simulating a UN Security Council Debate on the Syrian Crisis, Journal of Political Science Education, pp. 1-18en_US
dc.date.updated2019-09-24T03:06:02Z
dc.description.versionPost-printen_US
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Taylor & Francis (Routledge). This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies on 30 May 2019, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/15512169.2019.1616298en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHalvorson, Dan S.
gro.griffith.authorWest, Lucy


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