Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFoster, S
dc.contributor.authorHooper, P
dc.contributor.authorBurton, NW
dc.contributor.authorBrown, WJ
dc.contributor.authorGiles-Corti, B
dc.contributor.authorRachele, JN
dc.contributor.authorTurrell, G
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-16T22:20:08Z
dc.date.available2019-10-16T22:20:08Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0013-9165
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0013916519853300
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387784
dc.description.abstractInterrelationships between neighborhood walkability, area disadvantage, and crime may contribute to the inconsistent associations between crime and walking. We examined associations between crime and walking, and tested for differences by neighborhood disadvantage while addressing these additional complexities. Participants (n = 6,680) from 200 neighborhoods spanning the most and least disadvantaged in Brisbane, Australia, completed a questionnaire and objective measures were generated for the individual-level 1,000-m neighborhood. Multilevel models examined associations between crime (perceived and objective) and walking (recreational and transport), and interactions tested for differences by neighborhood disadvantage. High perceived crime was associated with reduced odds of transport walking, whereas high objective crime was associated with increased odds of transport walking. Patterns did not differ by neighborhood disadvantage. In disadvantaged neighborhoods, the “negative” criminogenic attributes were insufficient to outweigh the “positive” walkability attributes, producing similar walking patterns to advantaged neighborhoods where residents were dislocated from local destinations but buffered from crime.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSAGE Publications
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEnvironment and Behavior
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBuilt environment and design
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman society
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode33
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode44
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode52
dc.titleSafe Habitats: Does the Association Between Neighborhood Crime and Walking Differ by Neighborhood Disadvantage?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationFoster, S; Hooper, P; Burton, NW; Brown, WJ; Giles-Corti, B; Rachele, JN; Turrell, G, Safe Habitats: Does the Association Between Neighborhood Crime and Walking Differ by Neighborhood Disadvantage?, Environment and Behavior, 2019
dc.date.updated2019-09-26T04:47:22Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.rights.copyrightFoster S, Hooper P, Burton NW, Brown WJ, Giles-Corti B, Rachele J, Turrell G. Safe HABITATs: Does the association between neighbourhood crime and walking differ by neighbourhood disadvantage? Environment & Behaviour. Copyright 2019 The Authors. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBurton, Nicola W.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record