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dc.contributor.authorZoch-Lesniak, B
dc.contributor.authorWare, RS
dc.contributor.authorGrimwood, K
dc.contributor.authorLambert, SB
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-29T22:33:39Z
dc.date.available2019-09-29T22:33:39Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn2048-7207
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/jpids/piy136
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387807
dc.description.abstractBackground: Most acute respiratory infection (ARI) research focuses on severe disease and overlooks the burden of community-managed illness. For community-based studies, home-based specimen collection by parents could be a resource-saving alternative to collection by healthcare workers (HCWs). In this study, we compared parent and HCW groups for their likelihood to collect specimens and the timeliness and quality of such collection. Methods: In this unblinded randomized controlled trial, parents from Brisbane, Australia, were taught to identify new ARI episodes in their children aged <2 years. When their child had a new ARI, parents either collected a nasal swab from the child (P group) or contacted an HCW who visited to obtain a nasopharyngeal swab (HCW group). We compared the likelihood and timeliness of specimen collection and respiratory pathogen detection. A nested diagnostic study compared paired specimen collections from children in the HCW group. Results: Included were 76 incident ARI episodes from 31 children and 102 episodes from 33 children in the P and HCW groups, respectively. The proportions of ARIs for which a specimen was collected were similar (P group, 69.7%; HCW group, 72.5%; P = .77), and pathogens were detected in 93.8% and 77.5% of the specimens, respectively (P = .03). The period between ARI onset and specimen collection was shorter in the P group than in the HCW group (mean difference, 1.9 days [95% confidence interval, 0.7–3.0 days]; P < .001). For the 69 paired specimens, viral loads were lower in the parent-collected swabs (mean cycle threshold difference, 4.5 [95% confidence interval, 3.1–5.9]; P < .001). Conclusions: Parents and HCWs obtained samples in similar proportions of ARI episodes, but the parents collected the samples fewer days after ARI onset and with a resulting higher likelihood of pathogen identification. This method can be used in population-based epidemiological studies of ARI as a resource-saving alternative. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00966069.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.titleThe Respiratory Specimen Collection Trial (ReSpeCT): A Randomized Controlled Trial to Compare Quality and Timeliness of Respiratory Sample Collection in the Home by Parents and Healthcare Workers From Children Aged <2 Years
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationZoch-Lesniak, B; Ware, RS; Grimwood, K; Lambert, SB, The Respiratory Specimen Collection Trial (ReSpeCT): A Randomized Controlled Trial to Compare Quality and Timeliness of Respiratory Sample Collection in the Home by Parents and Healthcare Workers From Children Aged <2 Years., Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, 2019
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-12-15
dc.date.updated2019-09-27T00:01:35Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Oxford University Press. This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version: The Respiratory Specimen Collection Trial (ReSpeCT): A Randomized Controlled Trial to Compare Quality and Timeliness of Respiratory Sample Collection in the Home by Parents and Healthcare Workers From Children Aged <2 Years, Briefings in Bioinformatics, is available online at: 10.1093/jpids/piy136
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorLambert, Stephen B.
gro.griffith.authorGrimwood, Keith
gro.griffith.authorWare, Robert


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