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dc.contributor.authorCarim, Guido C
dc.contributor.authorSaurin, Tarcisio A
dc.contributor.authorDekker, Sidney WA
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-12T23:56:24Z
dc.date.available2019-12-12T23:56:24Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn1435-5558
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10111-019-00555-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387922
dc.description.abstractMore than 20 years ago, Woods proposed a model that accounts for the inherent complexity faced by operators when managing abnormal and emergency situations in highly complex sociotechnical systems. The model was reviewed a decade later and only a few studies have applied it to aviation. This paper proposes adjustments to the original model, based on recent theoretical developments and empirical evidence on the anomaly management activity in aviation. The model was divided into five components; three of which—activity, types of reasoning involved, and resources—were revisited and further developed. The two other components—fault behaviour and unit of analysis—were not updated and only discussed in the aviation context. As a result, the revisited model descriptively clarifies how the activity of anomaly management emerges from the use of a wide repertoire of strategies, involving a spectrum of types of reasoning and a set of resources for action, which are not limited to those anticipated by designers, such as checklists and the warning system. An instantiation of the revisited model highlights the implications of false alarms, which trigger a cascade of disturbances that, in turn, requires adaptive strategies based on heuristics and analogies and supported by pilot’s experience. The revisited model can support a more accurate analysis of anomalous situations and the redesign of work systems to achieve a better performance.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCognition, Technology & Work
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInformation Systems
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchDecision Making
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0806
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170202
dc.titleHow the cockpit manages anomalies: revisiting the dynamic fault management model for aviation
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationCarim, GC; Saurin, TA; Dekker, SWA, How the cockpit manages anomalies: revisiting the dynamic fault management model for aviation, Cognition, Technology & Work
dc.date.updated2019-09-30T03:48:58Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Springer London. This is an electronic version of an article published in Cognition, Technology & Work, (2019) . Cognition, Technology & Work is available online at: http://link.springer.com/ with the open URL of your article.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDekker, Sidney
gro.griffith.authorCarim Junior, Guido C.


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