Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHosseini-Bai, Shahla
dc.contributor.authorTrueman, Stephen J
dc.contributor.authorNevenimo, Tio
dc.contributor.authorHannet, Godfrey
dc.contributor.authorRandall, Bruce
dc.contributor.authorWallace, Helen M
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-30T04:12:35Z
dc.date.available2019-09-30T04:12:35Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0944-1344
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11356-019-05519-x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387937
dc.description.abstractThe selection of shade trees with appropriate spacing is important for minimising their impact on nutrient accumulation by understorey cash crops in agroforestry systems. Cocoa trees may be intercropped with overstorey legume or non-legume shade trees. A legume tree and/or a non-legume timber tree with edible kernels (Gliricidia sepium and Canarium indicum, respectively) are used as shade trees in cocoa plantations particularly in Papua New Guinea. This study explored the nutrient concentrations of cocoa beans in response to both tree-shade species and shade-tree spacing regime. The study also investigated the extent to which C. indicum tree spacing altered the nutrient concentrations of canarium kernels. G. sepium trees in the study had a final spacing of 12 m × 12 m while the spacing regimes of either 8 m × 8 m or 8 m × 16 m used for C. indicum. The calcium (Ca) concentrations of cocoa beans did not differ significantly between plants located next to G. sepium and plants located next to C. indicum. Cocoa beans next to C. indicum trees with spacing of 8 m × 16 m had higher potassium (K) concentrations than those next to G. sepium trees. However, phosphorus (P) concentrations of cocoa beans next to C. indicum trees with spacing of 8 m × 8 m or next to G. sepium trees were significantly higher than those next to C. indicum trees with spacing of 8 m × 16 m. The K concentrations in cocoa beans and soil were not correlated nor were the P concentrations in cocoa beans and soil. Correlations between nutrients in leaves and cocoa beans, or between leaves and canarium kernels, were not strong. Our results suggest that cocoa and canarium trees can be intercropped successfully, and that they do not compete for soil nutrients.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom22021
dc.relation.ispartofpageto22029
dc.relation.ispartofissue21
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEnvironmental Science and Pollution Research
dc.relation.ispartofvolume26
dc.subject.fieldofresearchChemical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode03
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode05
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsEnvironmental Sciences & Ecology
dc.subject.keywordsAgroforestry
dc.titleThe effects of tree spacing regime and tree species composition on mineral nutrient composition of cocoa beans and canarium nuts in 8-year-old cocoa plantations
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationHosseini-Bai, S; Trueman, SJ; Nevenimo, T; Hannet, G; Randall, B; Wallace, HM, The effects of tree spacing regime and tree species composition on mineral nutrient composition of cocoa beans and canarium nuts in 8-year-old cocoa plantations, Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 2019, 26 (21), pp. 22021-22029
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-05-17
dc.date.updated2019-09-30T04:10:34Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorHosseini-Bai, Shahla
gro.griffith.authorTrueman, Stephen J.
gro.griffith.authorWallace, Helen M.


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record