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dc.contributor.authorDodd, Natalie
dc.contributor.authorCarey, Mariko
dc.contributor.authorMansfield, Elise
dc.contributor.authorOldmeadow, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Tiffany-Jane
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-01T02:59:52Z
dc.date.available2019-10-01T02:59:52Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1326-0200
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1753-6405.12913
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/387981
dc.description.abstractObjective: Uptake of screening through the Australian National Bowel Cancer Screening Program remains low. General practice guidelines support the general practitioners’ role to offer CRC screening. This study tests the effect that an intervention including point‐of‐care FOBT provision, printed screening advice and GP endorsement has on self‐reported FOBT uptake. Methods: A multisite, 1:1 parallel‐arm, cluster‐randomised controlled trial. Participants aged 50–74, at average risk of CRC and overdue for screening were recruited from four general practices in New South Wales, Australia, from September 2016 to May 2017. Self‐report of FOBT up to eight weeks post baseline. Results: A total of 336 participants consented to complete a baseline survey (64% consent rate), of which 123 were recruited into the trial (28 usual care days and 26 intervention days). Follow‐up data was collected for 114 participants (65 usual care and 49 intervention). Those receiving the intervention had ten times greater odds of completing screening compared to usual care (39% vs. 6%; OR 10.24; 95%CI 2.9‐36.6, p=0.0006). Conclusions: A multicomponent intervention delivered in general practice significantly increased self‐reported FOBT uptake in those at average risk of CRC. Implications for public health: General practice interventions could serve as an important adjunct to the Australian National Bowel Cancer Screening Program to boost plateauing screening rates.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchApplied Economics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolicy and Administration
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1402
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1605
dc.subject.keywordscolorectal cancer
dc.subject.keywordsearly detection of cancer
dc.subject.keywordsfaecal occult blood test
dc.subject.keywordsgeneral practice
dc.subject.keywordsrandomised controlled trial
dc.titleTesting the effectiveness of a general practice intervention to improve uptake of colorectal cancer screening: a randomised controlled trial
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationDodd, N; Carey, M; Mansfield, E; Oldmeadow, C; Evans, TJ, Testing the effectiveness of a general practice intervention to improve uptake of colorectal cancer screening: a randomised controlled trial, Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 2019
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-05-01
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2019-10-01T02:58:02Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDodd, Natalie


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