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dc.contributor.authorBryant, J
dc.contributor.authorTuron, H
dc.contributor.authorMansfield, E
dc.contributor.authorCameron, E
dc.contributor.authorDodd, N
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-03T22:52:39Z
dc.date.available2019-10-03T22:52:39Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0885-8195
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s13187-019-01575-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/388041
dc.description.abstractIndividuals with a previous cancer diagnosis are at risk of cancer recurrence. However, many cancer survivors do not adhere to lifestyle recommendations to reduce cancer risk. Little is known about the extent to which cancer patients are asked about lifestyle risk factors by healthcare providers following diagnosis. The aim of this study is to determine among Australian cancer survivors the (1) proportion asked about smoking, alcohol consumption, nutrition and physical activity; (2) total number of lifestyle risk factors asked about; and (3) factors associated with being asked about fewer risk factors. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with cancer patients attending outpatient clinics. Eligible patients completed a baseline survey and a second survey 4 weeks later. Data about demographic and disease characteristics, and whether participants had been asked about smoking, alcohol, physical activity and diet since being diagnosed with cancer, was collected. A total of 144 patients were included in the analyses. Following diagnosis, most had been asked about smoking (86%), alcohol consumption (85%), physical activity (80%) and diet (69%) by a healthcare provider. Sixty-one percent of participants reported being asked about all four risk factors; only 6% recalled being asked about none. After controlling for age, participants with a high school or lower education were more likely to be asked about fewer risk factors (OR 2.16; 95%CI 1.0 to 4.6; p = 0.04) compared with those with a trade, vocational or university-level education. Just over one-third of a sample of Australian cancer patients were not asked about all assessed lifestyle risk factors following their diagnosis of cancer. These findings suggest there is scope to improve identification of lifestyle risk factors among cancer survivors.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Cancer Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1110
dc.titleDiscussions About Lifestyle Risk Factors Following a Cancer Diagnosis: Findings from a Sample of Australian Cancer Outpatients
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBryant, J; Turon, H; Mansfield, E; Cameron, E; Dodd, N, Discussions About Lifestyle Risk Factors Following a Cancer Diagnosis: Findings from a Sample of Australian Cancer Outpatients, Journal of Cancer Education, 2019
dc.date.updated2019-10-03T22:51:05Z
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorDodd, Natalie


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