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dc.contributor.advisorBest, Susan
dc.contributor.authorMcGregor, Carol Anne
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-25T03:23:35Z
dc.date.available2019-10-25T03:23:35Z
dc.date.issued2019-09-25
dc.identifier.doi10.25904/1912/2923
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/388148
dc.description.abstractA major focus of my visual art practice has been to contribute to the un-silencing of family and Australian Indigenous community histories and heritage. Un-silencing is my term to describe the personal and political acts needed to undo colonial structures and thinking. As a part of this undoing or decolonising, I have sought to share knowledges and to pass on information and skills through reinvigorating the art of Indigenous possum skin cloak-making in South-East Queensland. Little research or writing about Australian Aboriginal possum skin cloak-making exists, which is partly because of the hiatus in the actual making of cloaks as garments of use and for ceremony due to the forced interruption of cultural practices by early dominating colonialists. There are now only fourteen known historical animal skin cloaks or fragments of cloaks in existence. I have closely examined two of these cloaks: one is held in the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC, and the other in the Miles Historical Museum in Miles, Queensland. In order to continue the cultural practice of possum skin cloak-making in South-East Queensland, I facilitated (with fellow artist Glennys Briggs) a series of over fifty Indigenous community-based possum skin cloak-making workshops between 2014 and 2016. The outcome was the making of six community-owned possum skin cloaks that were displayed over six months in the exhibition Art of the Skins, State Library of Queensland, in 2016. Little-known historical references to the possum skin cloaks in this region were woven into the workshops to bring them to common knowledge and to emphasise the significance and importance of the continuum of this traditional cultural practice in South-East Queensland. The workshops informed my own practice-led research and making. The art on the skins documents biocultural knowledge of plants and place, drawn from guidance received from Elders and community members. Through this research, I hope to contribute to understanding particular aspects of the continuum of Australian Aboriginal cultural object making.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeBrisbane
dc.subject.keywordsPossum skin cloaks
dc.subject.keywordsAustralian
dc.subject.keywordsIndigenous communities
dc.subject.keywordsVisual art
dc.titleArt of the Skins: un-silencing and remembering
dc.typeGriffith thesis
gro.facultyArts, Education and Law
gro.rights.copyrightThe author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
dc.contributor.otheradvisorWatson, Judith
gro.thesis.degreelevelThesis (PhD Doctorate)
gro.thesis.degreeprogramDoctor of Visual Arts (DVA)
gro.departmentQueensland College of Art
gro.griffith.authorMcGregor, Carol Anne


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