Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJoypaul, S
dc.contributor.authorKelly, F
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, SS
dc.contributor.authorKing, MA
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-09T22:49:49Z
dc.date.available2019-10-09T22:49:49Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0223306
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/388199
dc.description.abstractBackground: There have been growing recommendations to include education in multi-disciplinary interventions targeting chronic pain management. However, effects of this strategy on short- and long-term self-management of chronic pain, remain largely unexplored. Objectives: 1. To provide an updated overview of studies that report on the impact of patient education in multi-disciplinary interventions, on self-management of chronic pain; 2. To explore associations between education and chronic pain self-management techniques; and 3. To identify the format and duration of suitable chronic pain interventions targeted at patient self-management. Methods: Design: Narrative systematic literature review of randomised or controlled study designs. Data Sources: PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO. Participants: Adult patients with chronic pain of any aetiology participating in multi-disciplinary programs that included education. Main outcome measures: Assessments of level of pain, function, quality of life, self-efficacy, self-management, and any other relevant assessments. Study Appraisal and Synthesis Methods: PRISMA guidelines, Cochrane Risk of Bias tool, and TIDieR model. Results: Database searching identified 485 potential papers. After removal of duplicates, and irrelevant articles by title and abstract, 120 full-text articles were reviewed and 27 studies were included in this systematic review. Studies were predominantly from the United States (n = 8; 29.6%). Over one hundred outcome measures were identified across all studies, with significant variation also observed in terms of how chronic pain duration was defined, and how education was delivered to participants. Overall, positive benefits of education were reported. Conclusions: Education, as part of multi-disciplinary programs, is likely to improve self-management and self-efficacy in people with chronic pain of any aetiology. Heterogeneity in terms of: chronic pain duration; educational resources; healthcare professionals; and outcome measures, were identified as limitations. Further research, in the form of Randomised Controlled Trials addressing these limitations, is recommended.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLoS)
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome0223306
dc.relation.ispartofissue10
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPLoS One
dc.relation.ispartofvolume14
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.titleMulti-disciplinary interventions for chronic pain involving education: A systematic review
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationJoypaul, S; Kelly, F; McMillan, SS; King, MA, Multi-disciplinary interventions for chronic pain involving education: A systematic review, PLoS One, 2019, 14 (10), pp. e0223306-
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-09-18
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.date.updated2019-10-09T20:52:33Z
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Joypaul et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMcMillan, Sara S.
gro.griffith.authorKelly, Fiona S.
gro.griffith.authorJoypaul, Diya
gro.griffith.authorKing, Michelle A.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record