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dc.contributor.authorRoberts, S
dc.contributor.authorTobiano, G
dc.contributor.authorMolasiotis, A
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, A
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-10T01:51:01Z
dc.date.available2019-10-10T01:51:01Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn0261-5614
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.clnu.2018.06.1726
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/388228
dc.description.abstractRationale: Patients with cancer face significant nutritional challenges, and families are in a position to contribute to nutrition care. This study tested the feasibility and acceptability of a patient- and family-centred nutrition intervention among cancer patients at 2 international sites. Methods: The intervention, based on theory and evidence, included patient and family participation in nutrition care through: interactive sessions with a dietitian to provide the patient's nutrition history, participate in targeted nutrition education, and engage in individualised goal setting; and keeping a daily food diary. It was tested at 2 sites: an inpatient oncology unit at an Australian hospital; and a palliative home-care oncology setting in Hong Kong. Feasibility and acceptability were explored through patient, family and clinician interviews. Results: 51 patients, family members and clinicians were interviewed. They found the intervention highly acceptable and valued patient- and family-centred aspects such as flexibility to cater for individual needs. Family engagement was seen to reduce stress for patients and families, which was a major benefit. The intervention was more feasible and appropriate for the home setting, due to patients being too unwell and family not always being present in the hospital setting. Hospital processes and restrictions (e.g. set meal times, limited food choices) were barriers to meeting nutrition goals and were not seen to align with the intervention's patient-centred aspects. Meanwhile, participants thought it an excellent way to improve nutrition intake and manage symptoms in the home setting. Conclusions: A patient- and family-centred nutrition intervention for cancer patients was more feasible in the home setting and was highly acceptable to patients, families and HCPs as they saw many benefits to participating.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefromS202
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoS202
dc.relation.ispartofjournalClinical Nutrition
dc.relation.ispartofvolume37
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNutrition and Dietetics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1111
dc.titlePartnering with families to promote nutrition in cancer care (the picnic study): Feasibility and acceptability of a patient- and family-centered nutrition intervention
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC3 - Articles (Letter/ Note)
dcterms.bibliographicCitationRoberts, S; Tobiano, G; Molasiotis, A; Marshall, A, Partnering with families to promote nutrition in cancer care (the picnic study): Feasibility and acceptability of a patient- and family-centered nutrition intervention, Clinical Nutrition, 2018, 37, pp. S202-S202
dc.date.updated2019-10-10T01:47:52Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMarshall, Andrea


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