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dc.contributor.authorBailey, TG
dc.contributor.authorPerissiou, M
dc.contributor.authorWindsor, MT
dc.contributor.authorSchulze, K
dc.contributor.authorNam, M
dc.contributor.authorMagee, R
dc.contributor.authorLeicht, AS
dc.contributor.authorGreen, DJ
dc.contributor.authorGreaves, K
dc.contributor.authorGolledge, J
dc.contributor.authorAskew, CD
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-15T23:50:55Z
dc.date.available2019-10-15T23:50:55Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn0363-6135
dc.identifier.doi10.1152/ajpheart.00344.2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/388413
dc.description.abstractEndothelial dysfunction is observed in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), who have increased risk of cardiovascular events and mortality. This study aimed to assess the acute effects of moderate- and higher-intensity exercise on endothelial function, as assessed by flow-mediated dilation (FMD), in AAA patients (74 ± 6 yr old, n ± 22) and healthy adults (72 ± 5 yr old, n ± 22). Participants undertook three randomized visits, including moderate-intensity continuous exercise [40% peak power output (PPO)], higher-intensity interval exercise (70% PPO), and a no-exercise control. Brachial artery FMD was assessed at baseline and at 10 and 60 min after each condition. Baseline FMD was lower [by 1.10% (95% confidence interval: 0.72=.81), P ± 0.044] in AAA patients than in healthy adults. There were no group differences in FMD responses after each condition (P ± 0.397). FMD did not change after no-exercise control but increased by 1.21% (95% confidence interval: 0.69=1.73, P < 0.001) 10 min after moderate-intensity continuous exercise in both groups and returned to baseline after 60 min. Conversely, FMD decreased by 0.93% (95% confidence interval: 0.41=1.44, P < 0.001) 10 min after higher-intensity interval exercise in both groups and remained decreased after 60 min. We found that the acute response of endothelial function to exercise is intensity-dependent and similar between AAA patients and healthy adults. Our findings provide evidence that regular exercise may improve vascular function in AAA patients, as it does in healthy adults. Improved FMD after moderate-intensity exercise may provide short-term benefit. Whether the decrease in FMD after higher-intensity exercise represents an additional risk and/or a greater stimulus for vascular adaptation remains to be elucidated. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Abdominal aortic aneurysm patients have vascular dysfunction. We observed a short-term increase in vascular function after moderate-intensity exercise. Conversely, higher-intensity exercise induced a prolonged reduction in vascular function, which may be associated with both short-term increases in cardiovascular risk and signaling for longer-term vascular adaptation in abdominal aortic aneurysm patients.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAmerican Physiological Society
dc.relation.ispartofpagefromH19
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoH30
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAmerican Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume314
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical Physiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhysiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1116
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0606
dc.subject.keywordsabdominal aortic aneurysm
dc.subject.keywordscardiovascular risk
dc.subject.keywordsendothelial function
dc.subject.keywordsexercise
dc.subject.keywordsflow-mediated dilation
dc.titleEffects of acute exercise on endothelial function in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBailey, TG; Perissiou, M; Windsor, MT; Schulze, K; Nam, M; Magee, R; Leicht, AS; Green, DJ; Greaves, K; Golledge, J; Askew, CD, Effects of acute exercise on endothelial function in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm, American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology, 2018, 314 (1), pp. H19-H30
dc.date.updated2019-10-15T23:48:18Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 American Physiological Society . This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorGreaves, Kim
gro.griffith.authorMagee, Rebecca


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