Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMcCartney, Danielle
dc.contributor.authorRattray, Megan
dc.contributor.authorDesbrow, Ben
dc.contributor.authorKhalesi, Saman
dc.contributor.authorIrwin, Christopher
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-16T02:17:00Z
dc.date.available2019-10-16T02:17:00Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn2347-467X
dc.identifier.doi10.12944/CRNFSJ.6.2.17
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/388428
dc.description.abstractSmoothies are popular dietary products. An online survey of Australian adults (n=833; 79% female) was used to explore patterns of smoothie consumption and individual motives for consuming these beverages. Participants commonly reported consuming fruit (98%), yoghurt (66%), milk (58%), honey (52%), fruit juice (46%), and nutritional supplements (46%) in smoothies. Compared to Infrequent Smoothie-Consumers (I-SC, <1·week-1; n=514), Frequent Smoothie-Consumers (F-SC, ≥1·week-1; n=269) were more likely to consume core-foods (e.g. vegetables, p<0.001) and less likely to consume discretionary items (e.g. honey or ice-cream, p’s<0.020) in smoothies. It followed that F-SC typically cited “health-related reasons” for consuming these beverages (i.e. to increase fruit/vegetable [57%] or nutrient [50%] intake, and/or to be “healthy” [56%]) and perceived these products as “nutritious” (84%); whilst I-SC often perceived them as “indulgent” (62%). Smoothies may play a positive role in the diet. However, beverages incorporating discretionary choices may increase energy, saturated fat and/or sugar intakes, offsetting the benefits of fruit/vegetable consumption.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherEnviro Research Publishers
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom425
dc.relation.ispartofpageto436
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCurrent Research in Nutrition and Food Science
dc.relation.ispartofvolume6
dc.subject.keywordsScience & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject.keywordsFood Science & Technology
dc.subject.keywordsConsumer behaviour
dc.subject.keywordsDietary behaviour
dc.titleSmoothies: Exploring the Attitudes, Beliefs and Behaviours of Consumers and Non-Consumers
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationMcCartney, D; Rattray, M; Desbrow, B; Khalesi, S; Irwin, C, Smoothies: Exploring the Attitudes, Beliefs and Behaviours of Consumers and Non-Consumers, Current Research in Nutrition and Food Science, 2018, 6 (2), pp. 425-436
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.date.updated2019-10-16T02:13:59Z
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 The Author(s). Published by Enviro Research Publishers. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDesbrow, Ben
gro.griffith.authorIrwin, Chris G.
gro.griffith.authorRattray, Megan E.
gro.griffith.authorMcCartney, Danielle J.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record