Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMoir, Emily
dc.contributor.authorHart, Timothy C
dc.contributor.authorReynald, Danielle M
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Anna
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-17T01:33:12Z
dc.date.available2019-10-17T01:33:12Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1460-3780
dc.identifier.doi10.1057/s41300-018-0057-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/388473
dc.description.abstractResearch suggests that personal and situational characteristics influence how and when residents provide guardianship over where they live (Reynald in J Res Crime Delinq 47(3): 358–390, 2010). However, there is limited empirical scholarship regarding what motivates residents to act as guardians and control crime in different contexts. The current study explores the role motivation and opportunity play in facilitating monitoring and intervention among potential guardians against crime in suburban Australia. Twenty semi-structured interviews with Brisbane suburban residents were conducted and suggested the existence of four typologies of suburban guardians: active, opportunistic, responsive, and non-guardians. Factors crucial to facilitating monitoring include the physical design of houses, relationships with neighbours, prior victimisation, and daily routine activities. Direct intervention is supported by feelings of responsibility and capability. Other themes found to support guardianship decision-making were also identified, and results suggest that residents supervise and monitor their street regardless of current crime rates. Implications for theory and practice, and directions for future research, are discussed.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillan UK
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto21
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCrime Prevention and Community Safety
dc.relation.ispartofvolume21
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolicy and Administration
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1605
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences
dc.subject.keywordsCriminology & Penology
dc.subject.keywordsRoutine activity theory
dc.subject.keywordsMonitoring
dc.subject.keywordsSurveillance
dc.titleTypologies of suburban guardians: understanding the role of responsibility, opportunities, and routine activities in facilitating surveillance
dc.typeJournal article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationMoir, E; Hart, TC; Reynald, DM; Stewart, A, Typologies of suburban guardians: understanding the role of responsibility, opportunities, and routine activities in facilitating surveillance, Crime Prevention and Community Safety, 2019, 21 (1), pp. 1-21
dc.date.updated2019-10-17T01:29:15Z
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 Palgrave Macmillan. This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in Crime Prevention and Community Safety. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Crime Prevention and Community Safety 2019, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 1–21 is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1057/s41300-018-0057-4
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorStewart, Anna L.
gro.griffith.authorReynald, Danielle M.
gro.griffith.authorMoir, Emily C.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record