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dc.contributor.authorKim, M
dc.contributor.authorBeehr, TA
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-22T01:21:19Z
dc.date.available2019-10-22T01:21:19Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1532-3005
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/smi.2796
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/388520
dc.description.abstractBased on the job demand‐resource theory, this study examined the differential relationships of two types of job demands, challenge and hindrance stressors, with three outcomes: ill health, organizational citizenship behaviour, and work engagement. These relationships were mediated by two personal resources: psychological empowerment and organization‐based self‐esteem (OBSE). Data were collected at two separate points, 2 weeks apart. With 336 full‐time U.S. employees, results from path analysis indicated that the challenge stressor, workload, was positively related to psychological empowerment and OBSE, both of which were in turn positively related to good work behaviours as well as negatively related to ill health, an indication that employees experienced physical symptoms and psychological strains. In contrast, hindrance stressors (role stressors and interpersonal conflict) showed the opposite patterns of relationships with these intermediate outcomes, resulting in less empowerment and OBSE. Overall, findings suggested that psychological empowerment and OBSE were important intrinsic motivational mechanisms through which some stressors (especially hindrance demands) can promote employees' favourable work behaviours as well as alleviate the negative health outcomes.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom367
dc.relation.ispartofpageto378
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalStress and Health
dc.relation.ispartofvolume34
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBusiness and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1503
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.titleChallenge and hindrance demands lead to employees' health and behaviours through intrinsic motivation
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationKim, M; Beehr, TA, Challenge and hindrance demands lead to employees' health and behaviours through intrinsic motivation, Stress and Health, 2018, 34 (3), pp. 367-378
dc.date.updated2019-10-18T00:30:39Z
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Challenge and hindrance demands lead to employees' health and behaviours through intrinsic motivation, Stress and Health, Volume 34, Issue 3, Pages 367-378, which has been published in final form at 10.1002/smi.2796. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorKim, Minseo


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