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dc.contributor.authorNunkoo, Robin
dc.contributor.authorSeetanah, Boopen
dc.contributor.authorAgrawal, Shambhavi
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-21T00:51:11Z
dc.date.available2019-10-21T00:51:11Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1660-5373
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/TR-04-2019-209
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/388545
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Sustainable tourism is an adaptive paradigm, borrowed from the parental concept of sustainable development (Hunter, 1997; Tosun, 2001). Sustainable development was made popular following the publication of the book “Our Common Future” by the World Commission on the Environment and Development (WCED) in 1987, where it is defined as “development which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs” (p. 42). This definition embeds two aspects. The first component relates to the meaning of development and the conditions necessary for sustainability (Miltin, 1992). In this context, development implies a process that raises the standard of living of people, relating not only to increasing the wealth of individuals but also to changing behaviors, aspirations and the different ways in which people view the world around them (Bartelmus, 1986; Hall, 2019). Therefore, development is not only concerned with institutional and economic changes but it also involves broader concerns such as quality of life, poverty reduction and prosperity (Hall, 2019). The second component of sustainable development takes a futuristic perspective of the term development. Thus, sustainable development embeds the following principles. First, any forms of development should be considered as a long term strategy and that policies aiming at achieving only short term gains should be rejected. Second, sustainable development focuses on inter and intra-generation balance of welfare. Third, the term applies to any countries, regardless of the type of development taking place, the level of development, and the socio-cultural and political conditions, although policies supporting sustainable tourism should be place-specific (Nunkoo and Gursoy, 2012; Nunkoo et al., 2010; Tosun, 2001).
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherEmerald
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom129
dc.relation.ispartofpageto137
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalTourism Review
dc.relation.ispartofvolume74
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTourism
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1506
dc.titleGuest editorial
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC3 - Articles (Letter/ Note)
dcterms.bibliographicCitationNunkoo, R; Seetanah, B; Agrawal, S, Guest editorial, Tourism Review, 2019, 74 (2), pp. 129-137
dc.date.updated2019-10-21T00:49:47Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Emerald. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorNunkoo, Robin


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