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dc.contributor.authorJackson, Sue
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-21T02:35:41Z
dc.date.available2019-10-21T02:35:41Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn2049-1948
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/wat2.1314
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/388556
dc.description.abstractIndigenous water rights contests take many forms, manifesting in conflict over water resource development, exclusion from decision‐making, marginalization in regional political economies and opposition to environmental degradation. A growing number of institutional options are available to recognize Indigenous water rights and a diversity of approaches is being taken by governments, courts of law, Indigenous peoples and others in response to historical and contemporary inequities and discrimination in patterns of distribution and participation in the institutions of water governance. Although not the only arena, political action directed towards change in state‐based institutions is a principal focus for Indigenous peoples engaged in water struggles. This article reviews the literature on Indigenous water rights in national frameworks of water governance from a range of disciplines. It describes the leading approaches to recognition, representation, and redistribution that exist under the domestic arrangements of nation‐states to recognize localized norms and rules of water use and custodianship, as well as Indigenous forms of political organization. These include statutory mechanisms to increase water access, treaties and settlements, constitutional protections for collective rights, self‐organized or internal governance models, market‐based approaches and moves in law to recognize reciprocal relationships to water and legitimize custodianship of rivers. Rather than take recognition for granted as an essential condition of or ideal end‐point to Indigenous water rights struggles, the paper critically reflects on the multi‐faceted dimensions of this ambivalent concept, revealing the opportunities as well as tensions and dilemmas in the leading approaches to addressing Indigenous water rights claims. This article is categorized under: Human Water > Rights to Water Human Water > Water Governance
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome1314:1
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe1314:15
dc.relation.ispartofissue6
dc.relation.ispartofjournalWiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Water
dc.relation.ispartofvolume5
dc.relation.urihttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/ARC/FT130101145
dc.relation.grantIDFT130101145
dc.relation.fundersARC
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolitical Science
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAustralian Government and Politics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1606
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160601
dc.titleWater and Indigenous rights: Mechanisms and pathways of recognition, representation, and redistribution
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationJackson, S, Water and Indigenous rights: Mechanisms and pathways of recognition, representation, and redistribution, Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Water, 2018, 5 (6), pp. e1314:1-e1314:15
dc.date.updated2019-10-21T00:52:51Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Water and Indigenous rights: Mechanisms and pathways of recognition, representation, and redistribution, Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Water, Volume 5, Issue 6, e1314, 2018, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/wat2.1314. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorJackson, Sue E.


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