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dc.contributor.authorThomas, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorGouk, Conor
dc.contributor.authorJayasakeera, Narlaka
dc.contributor.authorFreeman, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-21T04:35:33Z
dc.date.available2019-10-21T04:35:33Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn2378-5128en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1055/s-0036-1596060en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/388573
dc.description.abstractWith advancing technologies in orthopedics and increasing demands of the population for orthopedic interventions, younger patients are now receiving joint replacements. One of the potential risks of joint replacement is metallosis, or the local and systemic release of metal ions. Metallosis is caused by the release of metallic debris, secondary to hardware failure. The phenomenon is most commonly associated with failed metal-on-metal hip prostheses and is characterized locally by heavy staining of surrounding soft tissue, metallic synovitis, joint effusion, and gradual loosening of the prosthesis. Additionally, metallic debris can also lead to periarticular superficial skin manifestations. The release of metal ions has further been known to lead to systemic upsets including neurologic deficit (declining vision, hearing, or cognition; headaches), cardiac failure, and hypothyroidism. As the number of patients seeking major orthopedic interventions grows, the incidence of metallosis-related skin tattooing will also increase. The structural components of a failed joint replacement can be revised (improving patients' pain and functioning). However, any skin tattooing secondary to metallosis presents the treating dermatologist with clinical challenge, due to lack of research regarding treatment of this condition. Our aim is to review the published literature on metallosis, including the pathophysiology. After assessing publications on the treatment of traumatic and cosmetic tattooing, we hope to stimulate further research regarding treatment. This article should also serve to remind orthopedic surgeons that with increasing patient concern regarding cosmesis, a multispecialty approach including referral to a dermatologist is valuable.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherThieme Medical Publishersen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome143en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe146en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSurgery Journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume2en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103en_US
dc.subject.keywordsmetallosisen_US
dc.subject.keywordsmetallosis treatmenten_US
dc.titleThe Sequelae of Metallosis Resulting in Skin Pigmentation and Tattooing: A Case Presentation and Literature Review.en_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articlesen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationThomas, S; Gouk, C; Jayasakeera, N; Freeman, M, The Sequelae of Metallosis Resulting in Skin Pigmentation and Tattooing: A Case Presentation and Literature Review., Surgery Journal, 2016, 2 (4), pp. e143-e146en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-10-26
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
dc.date.updated2019-10-21T03:51:31Z
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc. and the Author(s). This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) License, which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorGouk, Conor J.


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