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dc.contributor.authorTuffley, David
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-23T22:56:45Z
dc.date.available2019-10-23T22:56:45Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.isbn978-1453866931
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/388640
dc.description.abstractThe kōan is an enigmatic or paradoxical question that defies logic, and forces you to break out of conventional modes of thinking, to use your imagination and intuition to arrive at a paradigm-shifting answer that moves you closer to enlightenment. A clichéd example that is commonly quoted is ‘what is the sound of one hand clapping?’ On the face of it, this seems like nonsense. Logic suggests that it takes two hands to make a sound. Many ‘correct’ answers have been suggested, but it is a mistake to think there is just one right answer; there are many. Some suggest that it is the same sound as two hands clapping, or that the answer lies in non-verbally outstretching one’s hand to the questioner, inviting them to a reciprocal clap. With kōans you are simply going through a process of recognizing that logic, while useful, works by placing your thinking on a confining box with limited option. In Zen, you are invited to recognize that the only way out of this box is to shift the paradigm by thinking imaginatively with your right brain. There are many answers because everyone will come up with their own unique solution. It is the act of transcending the worldly mind that is the important part. This chapter presents some of the classic kōans from traditional Zen, originally written hundreds of years ago in Japanese, and re-interpreted from early English translations into early 21st Century English. The underlying meaning remains, so they will still work as a kōan should, but they are expressed in language more easily understood by people in the 21st Century. Each kōan encapsulates a profound truth worthy of deep reflection over a not-insignificant period of time. There are no quick answers, silver bullets here. There is great value buried deep in the kōan. Your job is to patiently dig for it. Zen is a practice dedicated to lessening the influence of your ego which is the prime impediment to your uncovering your own true nature. The ego is so strong that you could go your entire lifetime without even suspecting there is something deeper that is forever obscured by the ungoverned ego. Therefore we should listen to the voice of pines and cedars when no wind stirs. When you perceive that silent voice, you have entered the field of pure being that is behind the phenomenal world and which is your true nature.
dc.publisherAltiora Publications
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.altiorapublications.com/
dc.subject.fieldofresearchApplied Ethics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHistory and Philosophy of Specific Fields
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhilosophy
dc.subject.fieldofresearchReligion and Religious Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2201
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2202
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2203
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2204
dc.titleZen Koans: Ancient Wisdom for Today
dc.typeBook
dc.type.descriptionA2 - Books (Other)
dcterms.bibliographicCitationTuffley, D, Zen Koans: Ancient Wisdom for Today, 2019
dc.date.updated2019-10-18T05:57:59Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Altiora Publications. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the publisher’s website for further information.
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gro.griffith.authorTuffley, David J.


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