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dc.contributor.authorCallander, Emily J
dc.contributor.authorTopp, Stephanie
dc.contributor.authorFox, Haylee
dc.contributor.authorCorscadden, Lisa
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-24T22:33:56Z
dc.date.available2019-10-24T22:33:56Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0730-7659
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/birt.12457
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/388664
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Designing effective universal health care systems has challenges, including the use of patient co-payments and the role of the public and private systems. This study sought to quantify the total amount of out-of-pocket fees incurred by women who gave birth in private and public hospitals within Australia-a country with universal health coverage-and assess the impact that variation in birth type has on out-of-pocket fees. METHODS: Data came from a linked administrative data set of all women who gave birth in the Australian state Queensland between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2015, plus their resultant children. Propensity score matching was used to create two similar cohorts of women who gave birth in private and public hospitals. RESULTS: The mean total out-of-pocket fees for care from conception to the child's first birthday was $2813 (±2683 standard deviation) and $623 (±1202) for women who gave birth in private and public hospitals, respectively. Total fees were higher in both public and private hospitals for women who had a cesarean birth ($716 [±1419] and $3010 [±2988]) than for women who had a vaginal birth without instruments ($556 [±1044] and $2560 [±2284]). DISCUSSION: Australia's strong policy incentives for women to take out private health insurance are leaving women with large out-of-pocket costs. This should hold important lessons for other countries implementing a universal health care system, to ensure that using a combination of public and private practitioners does not undermine the intention of universal care.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto8
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBirth
dc.subject.fieldofresearchApplied Economics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1402
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.keywordsbirth intervention
dc.subject.keywordsout of pocket charges
dc.subject.keywordsuniversal care
dc.subject.keywordsbirth intervention
dc.subject.keywordsout of pocket charges
dc.titleOut‐of‐pocket expenditure on health care by Australian mothers: Lessons for maternal universal health coverage from a long‐established system
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationCallander, EJ; Topp, S; Fox, H; Corscadden, L, Out-of-pocket expenditure on health care by Australian mothers: Lessons for maternal universal health coverage from a long-established system., Birth, 2019
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-09-11
dc.date.updated2019-10-23T01:57:26Z
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorCallander, Emily J.
gro.griffith.authorFox, Haylee


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