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dc.contributor.authorReingle, Jennifer M
dc.contributor.authorJennings, Wesley G
dc.contributor.authorConnell, Nadine M
dc.contributor.authorBusinelle, Michael S
dc.contributor.authorChartier, Karen
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-24T23:48:11Z
dc.date.available2019-10-24T23:48:11Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn0886-2605
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0886260514527172
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/388670
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to evaluate the role of demographic, mental health, and substance use as risk factors for intimate partner violence (IPV). Data were derived from Wave II of the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (2004-2005). Eligible participants (N = 25,778) reported having an intimate partner 1 year before the survey. Clustered survey multivariate multinomial regression methods were used to assess risk factors for episodes of IPV. IPV victimization, perpetration, and both victims/perpetrators were assessed. Bivariate analyses indicated that African Americans, Hispanics, and women were more likely to be victims, perpetrators, or victim/perpetrators as compared with men and Whites. Multivariate analyses suggested that having a marijuana use disorder was strongly associated with IPV victimization (odds ratio [OR] = 2.61) and victim/perpetration (OR = 2.65). Post-traumatic stress disorder was consistently associated with all IPV typologies. Depression was associated with victimization (OR = 2.00) and IPV victim/perpetration (OR = 1.74). Antisocial Personality Disorder and Mania were both related to IPV perpetration (ORs = 2.53 and 2.32) and victim/perpetration (ORs = 3.15 and 2.31). Results also indicated that alcohol use during episodes of IPV is common (i.e., 35% of those who reported IPV also reported that alcohol was involved). Results indicate several substance- and mental health–related correlates of IPV. In addition, findings indicate that alcohol use by the victim and/or perpetrator is common during IPV events. Policy implications and directions for future research are discussed.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSAGE Publications
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom2951
dc.relation.ispartofpageto2970
dc.relation.ispartofissue16
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
dc.relation.ispartofvolume29
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSocial Work
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1607
dc.subject.keywordsalcohol
dc.subject.keywordsintimate partner
dc.subject.keywordsmarijuana
dc.subject.keywordsmental health
dc.subject.keywordsviolence
dc.titleOn the Pervasiveness of Event-Specific Alcohol Use, General Substance Use, and Mental Health Problems as Risk Factors for Intimate Partner Violence
dc.typeJournal article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationReingle, JM; Jennings, WG; Connell, NM; Businelle, MS; Chartier, K, On the Pervasiveness of Event-Specific Alcohol Use, General Substance Use, and Mental Health Problems as Risk Factors for Intimate Partner Violence, Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 2014, 29 (16), pp. 2951-2970
dc.date.updated2019-10-24T04:32:50Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorConnell, Nadine M.


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