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dc.contributor.authorRaad, Nowar
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-28T03:03:59Z
dc.date.available2019-10-28T03:03:59Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/388717
dc.description.abstractStreets are prominent parts of public space and reflect the livability of communities. Many streets are designed primarily for cars and neglect pedestrian requirements. Yet pedestrians are a major user group of streets, especially in activity centres and commercial areas. The concept of pedestrian level-of-service (PLOS) is often used to objectively quantify how well footpaths in streets accommodate pedestrians. There is significant dispute as to what should, or should not, be included when calculating PLOS. A wide range of measures and tools have been developed for different pedestrian environments. These aid designers and engineers in developing or retrofitting streets, crossings and paths. This paper has two aims: i) to review the past experience with PLOS measures and tools, in part to highlight the problems of existing approaches, and ii) to outline a more robust approach and methods to develop an improved PLOS tool and measures. A systematic literature review identified 58 papers on PLOS tools and measures for analysis. These are categorised as being focused on streets, intersections, mid-block crossings and footpaths per se. The measures used in these studies are identified, categorised and tabulated under the themes of geometric/physical, traffic, network/environmental, and user characteristics. The most common metrics include volume/capacity ratios but there is growing interest in built environment measures relating to the amenity of the streetscape. There is also significant tension identified between subjective and objective measures and uncertainty about how to conceive of and include streetscape items. Very few of these PLOS studies have been developed from primary research, either via revealed pedestrian perceptions or using groups of experts. Even fewer studies have used testing to ensure that their tools have strong inter-rater reliability. A proposed approach and methods to develop a more robust tool is outlined. This is scoped at PLOS on commercial streets only, given the importance of this particular type of facility in Australian cities. The full pathway to tool development and testing is outlined. The methods include a Delphi process (online survey and a walkshop) with a panel of experts specialised in pedestrian issues, and intercept surveys with pedestrians.1
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Transport and Main Roads
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.atrf.info/papers/2017/files/ATRF2017_082.pdf
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename39th Australasian Transport Research Forum (ATRF 2017)
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleATRF 2017 - Australasian Transport Research Forum 2017, Proceedings
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2017-11-27
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2017-11-29
dc.relation.ispartoflocationAuckland, New Zealand
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTransport Engineering
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTransport Planning
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode090507
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120506
dc.titlePedestrian levels-of-service tools: Problems of conception, factor identification, measurement and usefulness
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conferences
dcterms.bibliographicCitationRaad, N; Burke, M, Pedestrian levels-of-service tools: Problems of conception, factor identification, measurement and usefulness, ATRF 2017 - Australasian Transport Research Forum 2017, Proceedings, 2017
dc.date.updated2019-10-24T05:23:43Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBurke, Matthew I.
gro.griffith.authorAbdalmajeed, Nowar Raad


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