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dc.contributor.authorHope, DL
dc.contributor.authorHattingh, L
dc.contributor.authorKing, MA
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-01T04:48:18Z
dc.date.available2019-11-01T04:48:18Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1445-937X
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jppr.1554
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/388813
dc.description.abstractBackground: Consumer awareness of emergency contraception is generally poor. School leavers (schoolies) engage in risky behaviours, including casual sex and alcohol and drug consumption. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the awareness of an at-risk population of schoolies regarding the use and availability of emergency contraception. Methods: An electronic survey was self-administered by participants using Wi-Fi-connected iPads at the Schoolies Wristband Distribution Centre, Surfers Paradise, on the first day of Queensland Schoolies Week, November 2017. Outcomes measured were awareness of the availability of emergency contraception from a pharmacy, maximum time for effective use following unprotected intercourse and whether emergency contraception is harmful to the health of the user. Results: Schoolies completed 498 valid surveys. Most (83.5%) were aged 17 years and 50.8% were aware that emergency contraception is available from community pharmacies with prescription and 36.7% were aware that it is available without prescription; 18.5% were aware of the 72- or 120-h effectiveness window and 38.0% agreed that it is not harmful. All questions were associated with considerable uncertainty. Females were 1.8- to 3.2-fold more likely than males to provide an appropriate response to any emergency contraception statement. Conclusion: Schoolies’ awareness of emergency contraception availability, effectiveness window and safety was low. At-risk schoolies may not access emergency contraception when indicated due to fear of harm, uncertainty about its effectiveness window or a lack of knowledge about timely non-prescription access from community pharmacies. Targeted education may improve current knowledge gaps. The misnomer ‘morning-after pill’ should be abandoned for the clinically appropriate term ‘emergency contraception’.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom460
dc.relation.ispartofpageto465
dc.relation.ispartofissue5
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Pharmacy Practice and Research
dc.relation.ispartofvolume49
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1115
dc.titleEmergency contraception awareness in an at-risk population
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationHope, DL; Hattingh, L; King, MA, Emergency contraception awareness in an at-risk population, Journal of Pharmacy Practice and Research, 2019, 49 (5), pp. 460-465
dc.date.updated2019-10-29T22:23:32Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 The Society of Hospital Pharmacists of Australia. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Emergency contraception awareness in an at‐risk population, Journal of Pharmacy Practice and Research, Volume 49, Issue 5, Pages 460-465, 2019, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/jppr.1554. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHope, Denise
gro.griffith.authorKing, Michelle A.
gro.griffith.authorHattingh, Laetitia L.


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