Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDodd, Natalie
dc.contributor.authorCarey, Mariko Leanne
dc.contributor.authorMansfield, Elise
dc.contributor.authorOldmeadow, Christopher
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-01T00:36:30Z
dc.date.available2019-11-01T00:36:30Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1929-0748
dc.identifier.doi10.2196/resprot.7432
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/388824
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) significantly reduces mortality associated with this disease. In Australia, the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program provides regular fecal occult blood tests (FOBT) for those aged 50 to 74 years, however, participation rates in the program have plateaued at 36%. Given low uptake in the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program, it is necessary to explore alternate methods to increase CRC screening rates. Primary care is a promising adjunct setting to test methods to increase CRC screening participation. Primary care guidelines support the recommendation and provision of CRC screening to primary care patients. Those in the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program target age range frequently present to their primary care provider. OBJECTIVE: This study tests the effect that a multicomponent primary care-based intervention has on CRC screening uptake when compared to usual care. METHODS: Primary care patients presenting for an appointment with their primary care provider complete a touchscreen survey to determine eligibility for the trial. Those aged 50 to 74 years, at average risk of CRC, with no history of CRC or inflammatory bowel disease, who have not had an FOBT in the past 2 years or a colonoscopy in the past 5 years are eligible to participate in the trial. Trial participants are randomized to the intervention or usual care group by day of attendance at the practice. The intervention consists of provision of an FOBT, printed information sheet, and primary care provider endorsement to complete the FOBT. The usual care group receives no additional care. RESULTS: The primary outcome is completion of CRC screening 6 weeks after recruitment. The proportion of patients completing CRC screening will be compared between trial groups using a logistic regression model. CONCLUSIONS: CRC screening rates in Australia are suboptimal and interventions to increase screening participation are urgently required. This protocol describes the process of implementing a multicomponent intervention designed to increase CRC screening uptake in a primary care setting. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12616001299493; https://anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=371136&isReview=true (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6pL0VYIj6). Universal Trial Number U1111-1185-6120.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherJMIR Publications Inc.
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome86:1
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe86:8
dc.relation.ispartofissue5
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJMIR Research Protocols
dc.relation.ispartofvolume6
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOncology and Carcinogenesis
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1112
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.keywordsclinical trial
dc.subject.keywordscolorectal cancer
dc.subject.keywordsearly detection of cancer
dc.subject.keywordsgeneral practice
dc.subject.keywordsprimary care
dc.titleTesting the Effectiveness of a Primary Care Intervention to Improve Uptake of Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationDodd, N; Carey, ML; Mansfield, E; Oldmeadow, C, Testing the Effectiveness of a Primary Care Intervention to Improve Uptake of Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol., JMIR Research Protocols, 2017, 6 (5), pp. e86:1-e86:8
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-04-02
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
dc.date.updated2019-10-31T03:21:09Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© Natalie Dodd, Mariko Leanne Carey, Elise Mansfield, Christopher Oldmeadow. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 10.05.2017. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in JMIR Research Protocols, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://www.researchprotocols.org, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDodd, Natalie


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record