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dc.contributor.authorDeshpande, Sameer
dc.contributor.authorBhanot, Anurudra
dc.contributor.editorAndaleeb, Syed Saad
dc.contributor.editorHasan, Khalid
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-05T00:41:18Z
dc.date.available2019-11-05T00:41:18Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.isbn9781786357465
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/978-1-78635-746-520161016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/388901
dc.description.abstractSales training is considered critical in a marketing organization because it improves “sales competencies such as creativity in the sales process, problem solving, ethical decision making, and effective listening skills.”1 According to scholars such as Attia, Honeycutt, and Leach,2 sales force training improves the effectiveness of marketing strategies, specifically to achieve higher sales and consumer satisfaction. Leach and Liu3 report that effective sales training programs improve organizational commitment, sales performance, and customer relations. Studies have assessed the influence of training from the perspectives of both buyers and sellers to get 360-degree feedback.4 However, previous sales management studies have not explored how training influences knowledge, beliefs, and behaviors of both the sales force and consumers, attributes that are at the core of a consumer persuasion process. We contribute to the sales force training literature by exploring these influences using Donald Kirkpatrick’s model5 for evaluating the effectiveness of sales training. Kirkpatrick’s model recommends carrying out the process in four steps: at level 1 (the reactions stage), trainees provide information on how much they like and comprehend the training program. Level 2 (the learning stage) entails assessment of the skills and knowledge trainees have acquired and how their attitude toward the subject matter has changed. Level 3 (the transfer stage) emphasizes ascertaining whether trainees’ changes in knowledge and attitude transfer to change in sales behavior. Level 4 (the results stage) measures change in sales and consumer performance as a result of sales training.
dc.publisherEmerald
dc.publisher.placeUK
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleStrategic Marketing Management in Asia
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom465
dc.relation.ispartofpageto473
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMarketing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1505
dc.titleInfluence of Sales Force Training Primary Healthcare
dc.typeBook chapter
dc.type.descriptionB2 - Chapters (Other)
dcterms.bibliographicCitationDeshpande, S; Bhanot, A, Influence of Sales Force Training Primary Healthcare, Strategic Marketing Management in Asia, 2017
dc.date.updated2019-11-04T06:10:25Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2017 Emerald. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. It is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the publisher’s website for further information.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDeshpande, Sameer


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