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dc.contributor.authorJalandoni, Andrea
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-02T00:19:51Z
dc.date.available2019-12-02T00:19:51Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1040-6182
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.quaint.2019.10.008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/389065
dc.description.abstractArchaeology has a long history of appropriating methods from other disciplines. Remote sensing techniques are an underexploited resource that have the potential to advance the study of rock art by improving visualization and analysis, and automating tasks such as detection and tracing. Remote sensing involves acquiring data from an object without making physical contact. Usually it describes data obtained from satellites or aircraft from a distance, but that is a limited definition. Remote sensing is not simply about the distance data is collected from, but it is the process of recording, measuring, and analyzing images and electromagnetic radiant energy (Ebert, 1984). Techniques that are used in satellite imaging can be used on a microscale to record, enhance, and analyze rock art. Documenting cultural heritage gives it meaning, develops understanding, allows it to be defined, and allows for recognition of its value (Haddad, 2011). Recently, there have been good resources for digital documentation of cultural heritage such as artifacts, architectural structures, boats, and manuscripts. (Bassier et al., 2018; Bentkowska-Kafel and MacDonald, 2018; Pavlidis et al., 2007). The aim of this paper is to explore the applications of remote sensing, particularly 3D modelling, that specifically benefit rock art research. Bassier et al. (2018) identified a gap between data gathered and useful end-products in digital cultural heritage documentation. The problem is exacerbated by the exclusivity of proprietary software and technical knowledge. A collaborative study between Intersect and the University of Sydney found that researchers need better support, training and services for the use of digital technologies for data management in research (Intersect, 2009). When the cost of producing data is being considered, the potential of data and the optimization of returns should be cogitated (Haubt and Jalandoni, 2019). Raw data should be recycled into as many useful products as possible. Therefore, this paper addresses the need for clear workflows to turn raw data in to useful products for rock art research. The emphasis is on accessible remote sensing deliverables derived from 3D models of rock art using examples from Australia, the Philippines, and Micronesia. There are undoubtedly other remote sensing techniques not mentioned here, however, the intention of this paper is not to be comprehensive but to serve as an introduction to the ways archaeologists can add value to their 3D models in rock art research.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto8
dc.relation.ispartofjournalQuaternary International
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhysical Geography and Environmental Geoscience
dc.subject.fieldofresearchArchaeology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchGeology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0406
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2101
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0403
dc.titleAn Overview of Remote Sensing Deliverables for Rock Art Research
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationJalandoni, A, An Overview of Remote Sensing Deliverables for Rock Art Research, Quaternary International, 2019, pp. 1-8
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.date.updated2019-11-12T00:21:03Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Elsevier Ltd and the International Union for Quaternary Research (INQUA). Published by Elsevier Ltd. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorJalandoni, Andrea T.


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