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dc.contributor.authorMay, Sally
dc.contributor.authorMaralngurra, Josie Gumbuwa
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Iain G
dc.contributor.authorGoldhahn, Joakim
dc.contributor.authorLee, Jeffrey
dc.contributor.authorO’Loughlin, Gabrielle
dc.contributor.authorMay, Kadeem
dc.contributor.authorNabobbob, Christine Ngalbarndidj
dc.contributor.authorGarde, Murray
dc.contributor.authorTacon, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-12T04:18:47Z
dc.date.available2019-11-12T04:18:47Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0813-0426
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/389077
dc.description.abstractThe Anbangbang Gallery in the Burrungkuy area of Kakadu National Park in-cludes some of the most iconic rock art imagery from Australia. Visited and enjoyed by tens of thousands of visitors every year it stands as a testament to Aboriginal culture and provides a glimpse into the remarkable rock art traditions of this region. Yet, most visitors are surprised to discover that rock art was still being produced at this site in the 1960s. In this paper, we explore the most recent rock art created at the Anbangbang Gallery. Most importantly, we present new evidence from a first-hand account of the paintings being created in 1963/64 and discuss the implications of these new insights for our understanding of the practice, the art-ists, and the social context of rock art in northern Australia.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAustralian Rock Art Research Association
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.ifrao.com/rock-art-research-journal/
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom199
dc.relation.ispartofpageto213
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalRock Art Research
dc.relation.ispartofvolume36
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Archaeology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchVisual Arts and Crafts
dc.subject.fieldofresearchArchaeology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode210101
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1905
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2101
dc.title‘This is my Father’s Painting’: A First-Hand Account of the Creation of the Most Iconic Rock Art in Kakadu National Park
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationTacon, P; May, S; Maralngurra, JG; Johnston, IG; Goldhahn, J; Lee, J; O’Loughlin, G; May, K; Nabobbob, CN; Garde, M, ‘This is my Father’s Painting’: A First-Hand Account of the Creation of the Most Iconic Rock Art in Kakadu National Park, Rock Art Research, 2019, 36 (2), pp. 199-213
dc.date.updated2019-11-12T04:06:12Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Archaeological Publications. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorTacon, Paul S.
gro.griffith.authorMay, Sally K. K.
gro.griffith.authorGoldhahn, Joakim


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