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dc.contributor.authorTacon, Paul
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Wayne
dc.contributor.authorKing, Graham
dc.contributor.authorPross, Dave
dc.contributor.authorKelleher, Matthew
dc.contributor.editorHuntley, Jillian
dc.contributor.editorNash, George
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-17T23:18:27Z
dc.date.available2019-11-17T23:18:27Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.isbn9781784919993
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/389149
dc.description.abstractIn 2001 we began The Landscape of Blue Mountain Rock Art research project. Since then, over 250 rock art sites have been recorded in Wollemi National Park, consisting of engravings, drawings, stencils and some paintings. Two of the largest, best preserved and culturally significant sites are Eagle’s Reach, with drawings and stencils, and Gallery Rock, an engraved platform. Although images were made using very different techniques there are many common subjects and stylistic features between the sites. Each location also shares imagery with smaller sites across southern Wollemi, where most research has been undertaken. For contemporary Aboriginal people of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area these two sites are highly significant as inter-related cultural places that are focal points within larger cultural landscapes. In this paper, we report the contemporary cultural significance of Gallery Rock and articulate its relationship to Eagle’s Reach and other nearby rock shelter art sites. Discussion focuses on the interpretation of some figures as key Ancestral Beings and whether some, such as Baiame, have a pre-European settlement context, something of great interest to John Clegg who visited Gallery Rock in 2007.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherArchaeopress Publishing
dc.publisher.placeOxford
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.archaeopress.com/ArchaeopressShop/Public/displayProductDetail.asp?id={0D9AA92C-AC99-4B01-AA1C-972223C72EEC}
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleAesthetics, Applications, Artistry and Anarchy: Essays in Prehistoric andContemporary Art. A Festschrift in honour of John Kay Clegg11 January 1935 – 1 March 2015
dc.relation.ispartofchapter5
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom71
dc.relation.ispartofpageto84
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander archaeology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode450101
dc.titleThe contemporary cultural significance of Gallery Rock, a petroglyph complex recently found in Wollemi National Park, New South Wales, Australia
dc.typeBook chapter
dc.type.descriptionB2 - Chapters (Other)
dcterms.bibliographicCitationTacon, P; Brennan, W; King, G; Pross, D; Kelleher, M, The contemporary cultural significance of Gallery Rock, a petroglyph complex recently found in Wollemi National Park, New South Wales, Australia, Aesthetics, Applications, Artistry and Anarchy: Essays in Prehistoric and Contemporary Art. A Festschrift in honour of John Kay Clegg 11 January 1935 – 1 March 2015, 2019, pp. 71-84
dc.date.updated2019-11-12T23:27:44Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.description.notepublicAfter all reasonable attempts to contact the publisher, this work was published in good faith in interests of the digital preservation of academic scholarship. Please contact copyright@griffith.edu.au with any questions or concerns.
gro.rights.copyright© The individual authors and Archaeopress, 2019. This material has been published as Tacon, P., The contemporary cultural significance of Gallery Rock, a petroglyph complex recently found in Wollemi National Park, New South Wales, Australia, in: J. Huntley & G. Nash, Aesthetics, Applications, Artistry and Anarchy: Essays in Prehistoric and Contemporary Art
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorTacon, Paul S.


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