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dc.contributor.authorCoessens, Kathleen
dc.contributor.authorTomlinson, Vanessa
dc.contributor.editorCoessens, Kathleen
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-04T22:23:19Z
dc.date.available2019-12-04T22:23:19Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.isbn9789462701847
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/389150
dc.description.abstractThe senses appear on the boundary between the inside and the outside of human experience. They are like an open door through which light, impres-sions, and air enter, are exchanged, and merge with the light, impressions, and air that were there before, exchanging inner and outer. While perception and sensoriality appear to be experiences that happen in real time, the sensorial can and most of the time does inhabit imagination in very precise ways. Sensorial imagination is related to human experience, to sensorial remembrance, and is based on sensorial knowledge. It happens in the present, is sustained by the sensorial knowledge of the past, and projects itself by way of sensorially driven expectations towards the future. Our sensorial imagination leads our interpret-ations, expectations, and actions. Offering background information as well as projecting expectation, it is an important cue for understanding the world, for creating synaesthetic associations, and for making connections between our experience and knowledge and those of others. Sensorial imagination has for a long time been linked mainly to vis-ual imagination. The word imagination even contains a visual reference to “image.” However, not all our experiences are related to the visual. Just start to think about everyday experiences like the wind, water, a dark country path, a hidden heap of rubbish: all these experiences are sensorial in different modal-ities: haptic, olfactive, auditory, motoric. In the context of art, and specifically music, this multi-sensory presence—involving a synaesthetic approach—is of uttermost importance. A musician sees a score, hears the music, has a haptic and motoric sense of how to interact with both, and can anticipate this in an imaginary multi-sensorial mode.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherLeuven University Press
dc.publisher.placeBelgium
dc.publisher.urihttps://lup.be/products/125491?_pos=1&_sid=6ef4abfd9&_ss=r
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleSensorial Aesthetics in Music Practices
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom169
dc.relation.ispartofpageto181
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPerforming Arts and Creative Writing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1904
dc.subject.keywordsMusic
dc.titleOn the Sensorial of Imagination
dc.typeBook chapter
dc.type.descriptionB2 - Chapters (Other)
dcterms.bibliographicCitationCoessens, K; Tomlinson, V, On the Sensorial of Imagination, Sensorial Aesthetics in Music Practices, 2019, pp. 169-181
dc.date.updated2019-11-16T03:12:17Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© Universitaire Pers Leuven/Leuven University Press, 2019. This material has been published as Coessens, K. & Tomlinson, V. (2019), On the Sensorial of Imagination, in K. Coessens (Ed.) Sensorial Aesthetics in Music Practices (pp. 169-181).
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorTomlinson, Vanessa


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