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dc.contributor.authorYu, Songyan
dc.contributor.authorBond, Nick R
dc.contributor.authorBunn, Stuart E
dc.contributor.authorKennard, Mark J
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-18T23:12:09Z
dc.date.available2019-11-18T23:12:09Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0043-1397
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2019wr025216
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/389183
dc.description.abstractMany organisms living in temporary streams rely on remnant surface water to survive during extended dry periods and recolonize newly established habitats when flow resumes. However, research on the spatio‐temporal variations of surface water extent for entire river networks is scarce. In this study, we first present a new field method for rapid surface water assessment. Next, we develop predictive models relating observed water extent to environmental attributes at a large number of surveyed stream segments (n=241) in eastern Australian coastal catchments. We use the models to predict daily variations in surface water dynamics throughout entire river networks over the period of 1911‐2017, based on available long‐term environmental attributes influencing hydrological processes. We find descriptors of surface water extent can be accurately predicted based on robust internal and external validations. Environmental predictor variables representing water gaining processes were more important in predicting surface water extent than variables representing water losses. Simulated long‐term variations in surface water extent were highly dynamic through space and time, particularly in inland streams, which were predicted to be the driest on average. Total stream length with surface water ranged from 8,974 to 13,742 km across the study period. Our study presents a novel and practical approach to quantifying and predicting variations in surface water extent, with potential applicability to other parts of the world. The simulated surface water extent through space and time can be used to identify and prioritize potential aquatic refuge areas that sustain aquatic biodiversity in river networks during extended dry periods.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.sponsorshipFederal Department of Environment
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Union (AGU)
dc.relation.ispartofjournalWater Resources Research
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhysical Geography and Environmental Geoscience
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCivil Engineering
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Engineering
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0406
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0905
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0907
dc.titleDevelopment and application of predictive models of surface water extent to identify aquatic refuges in eastern Australian temporary stream networks
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationYu, S; Bond, NR; Bunn, SE; Kennard, MJ, Development and application of predictive models of surface water extent to identify aquatic refuges in eastern Australian temporary stream networks, Water Resources Research
dc.date.updated2019-11-10T22:02:12Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorKennard, Mark J.
gro.griffith.authorYu, Sunny
gro.griffith.authorBond, Nick R.
gro.griffith.authorBunn, Stuart E.


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