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dc.contributor.authorNewton Cain, Tess
dc.contributor.editorByrne, Caitlin
dc.contributor.editorWest, Lucy
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-21T22:21:35Z
dc.date.available2019-11-21T22:21:35Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-925455-89-2en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/389189
dc.description.abstractSince winning the election in May 2019, Scott Morrison has maintained his categorical statement that the Pacific islands region is ‘front and centre of Australia’s strategic outlook, our foreign policy, our personal connections, including at the highest levels of government’.1 Based on what we heard from Labor during the 2019 campaign period, it is safe to assume that this is essentially a bipartisan approach.2 The “Pacific step-up” is now embedded in political and bureaucratic rhetoric and its prominence is rightly associated with the leadership of Morrison. But its position in the policy ecosystem predates him becoming Prime Minister in August of 2018, dating back to a 2016 announcement by then Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull3 followed by its inclusion in the Foreign Policy White Paper that was released in November of 2017.4 So, in terms of assessing how the “Pacific step-up” is progressing, we can look back over a period of 18 months or so. Late last year, as we neared the first anniversary of the release of the White Paper, I framed my assessment in terms of whether Australia’s engagement with the Pacific islands region was a ‘step up’ or a ‘stumble’.5 But a lot has happened since then. Now is a good time to reflect on what has happened, what informs what is happening now and what this might mean for the future. In the Australian political, economic and media landscapes, foreign policy does not merit a great deal of bandwidth. And within the very narrow scope of mainstream foreign policy discussion and analysis, the Pacific struggles to maintain even a toehold at times. But at this particular moment, there seems to be more appetite for thinking and talking about Australia’s relationships with her nearest neighbours than we have seen for many years. Whilst this is no doubt a significant national conversation, there is much to explore in terms of what this means for Queensland, described by PM Morrison as ‘our gateway to the Pacific’.6 Drawing on many and various threads of geographic proximity, economic linkages, cultural affinities, a complex and contentious history, vibrant diaspora communities, and future opportunities, now is the time for Queensland to (re)establish itself as Australia’s Pacific state. This report provides an assessment of the state of the “Pacific step-up” to inform decisions by policy makers, the business sector, and others to take that forward. The various aspects of what constitutes the “Pacific step-up” are listed in Figure 1. They touch on a range of sectors and aspects of Australia’s relationships with the Pacific islands region: security, economic linkages, diplomacy, and people-to-people links. They have been articulated via the 2017 Foreign Policy White Paper, ministerial speeches and announcements.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.griffith.edu.au/asia-institute/partnerships-collaborations/state-of-the-neighbourhooden_US
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitleState of the Neighbourhooden_US
dc.relation.ispartofchapter4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom37en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto47en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolicy and Administrationen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1605en_US
dc.titleThe State of the Step-Up: Australia's Engagement with the Pacificen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.type.descriptionB2 - Chapters (Other)en_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationNewton Cain, T, The State of the Step-Up: Australia's Engagement with the Pacific. In State of the Neighbourhood, 2019, pp. 37-47en_US
dc.date.updated2019-11-19T05:51:32Z
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.rights.copyright© Griffith University 2019. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the publisher’s website for further information.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorNewton Cain, Theresa


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