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dc.contributor.authorBarkworth, Julie M
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Kristina
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-03T01:54:32Z
dc.date.available2019-12-03T01:54:32Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0741-8825
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/07418825.2019.1666905
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/389275
dc.description.abstractPrison staff are vital for enforcing order in prisons. However, order is not only maintained by what prison staff do, but also relies on prisoners willingly following the directives of prison staff and complying with prison rules and procedures. This article puts forward the idea that how prison staff treat prisoners can affect the social distancing prisoners put between themselves and prison staff, potentially making defiance and non-compliance more difficult to manage. Social distancing is operationalised in this article as motivational posturing. Using survey responses from 177 Australian prisoners, the article shows a strong association between prisoners’ perceptions of procedural justice in prison and their self-reported compliance with prison rules. It also shows for the first time that motivational postures exist in a corrections context, and are associated with both procedural justice perceptions and self-reported compliance behaviour. Postures are also found to mediate the procedural justice/compliance relationship.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJustice Quarterly
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences
dc.subject.keywordsCriminology & Penology
dc.subject.keywordsProcedural Justice
dc.subject.keywordsPERCEPTIONS
dc.subject.keywordsSocial Sciences
dc.titleProcedural Justice, Posturing and Defiant Action: Exploring Prisoner Reactions to Prison Authority
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBarkworth, JM; Murphy, K, Procedural Justice, Posturing and Defiant Action: Exploring Prisoner Reactions to Prison Authority, Justice Quarterly, 2019
dc.date.updated2019-11-19T05:16:34Z
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Taylor & Francis (Routledge). This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Justice Quarterly (JQ) on 24 Sep 2019, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/07418825.2019.1666905
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBarkworth, Julie M.
gro.griffith.authorMurphy, Kristina


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