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dc.contributor.authorStewart, Heatheren_US
dc.contributor.authorMeadows, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorBowman, Leoen_US
dc.contributor.authorvan Vuuren, Kittyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMulligan, Paulineen_US
dc.contributor.editorProfessor Ian Richardsen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T09:53:32Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T09:53:32Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.date.modified2011-07-22T06:36:47Z
dc.identifier.issn08102686en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/38935
dc.description.abstractThe continuing stereotypical coverage ofIndigenous affairs in theAustralian media suggests that journalists are still finding it difficult to come to terms with more effective ways ofreporting such issues. The many hundreds of students who graduate from journalism programs across Australia represent an opportunity to at least challenge the predominant methods and strategies. But how prepared are journalism graduatesfor working with Indigenous issues? This paper explores the processes involved in an intensive reportingpractice course held at the University of Queensland mid-2009. The course aimed to raise journalism students' awa1'eness ofsome of the issues involved as well as enabling them to interact and work with personnel from the Brisbane Indigenous media community, 98.9 FM, the Nat/onalIndigenous Radio Service, SBS and the ABC. The jiiuiings suggest that such structured programs have a Significant impact on changing students'perceptions oj, and approaches to, their role asjournalists.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent109889 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherJournalism Education Associationen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://jeaa.org.au/journal.htmen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom59en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto72en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journalism Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume32en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedia Studiesen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode200104en_US
dc.titleIndigenous Voice: a work-integrated learning case study in journalism educationen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2010 Journalism Education Association. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2010
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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