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dc.contributor.authorCooke, Graham
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-04T01:16:14Z
dc.date.available2019-12-04T01:16:14Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn2201-1919
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/389478
dc.description.abstractIn an attempt to respond to the West’s general obliviousness to nonhuman semiosis, this article proposes a method for appreciating nonhuman poetics. By combining the critical tools of poetics and literary theory with insights from ethology and biosemiotics, Stuart Cooke outlines a method of criticism for nonhuman creative compositions. Drawing on the work of Gerald Bruns, Elizabeth Grosz, and Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, Cooke begins by theorizing a poetics that attends to the ecology of forces that produce, and are produced by, a work rather than the intentions of a single artist. Cooke proposes that an ethological poetics emphasizes the expressive capacity of materials across a range of written, musical, visual, and performative structures. By studying these expressive forces, Cooke argues, we can extend our appreciation of art and poetics into multispecies domains. The challenge is not to focus on the “meaning” or intention of nonhuman artworks but to study their disruptive, and exciting, forces. The third part of the essay is a case study of an Australian songbird, the Albert’s lyrebird, whose remarkable performance Cooke reads in terms of an ethological poetics. Producing an operatic complex of song, instrumentation, dance, and stage design, the male lyrebird’s composition is thoroughly entangled with the flora and fauna of his umwelt. Resistant to categorization by any generic label, Cooke argues that the lyrebird’s composition is best approached in the terms of transgressive, avant-garde performative and sound poetics—although it escapes such terms, thinking about the bird’s composition in this way compels us into a relation with its territory.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherUniversity of New South Wales
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom302
dc.relation.ispartofpageto323
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEnvironmental Humanities
dc.relation.ispartofvolume11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLiterary Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCultural Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHistorical Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2005
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2002
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2103
dc.titleToward an Ethological Poetics: The Transgression of Genre and the Poetryof the Albert’s Lyrebird
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationCooke, G, Toward an Ethological Poetics: The Transgression of Genre and the Poetry of the Albert’s Lyrebird, Environmental Humanities, 2019, 11 (2), pp. 302-323
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
dc.date.updated2019-12-03T06:15:52Z
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Stuart Cooke. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial-No Derivs 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/) . This license permits use and distribution of the article for non-commercial purposes, provided the original work is cited and is not altered or transformed.
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gro.griffith.authorCooke, Stuart S.


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