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dc.contributor.authorUddin, Riaz
dc.contributor.authorBurton, Nicola W
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Asaduzzaman
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-16T00:20:39Z
dc.date.available2019-12-16T00:20:39Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0033-2720
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11126-019-09697-2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/389673
dc.description.abstractInsufficient physical activity (PA) and prolonged sedentary behaviour (SB) may have deleterious psychological health consequences. Using one-year prospective data, this study examined the combined effects of PA and SB on psychological distress among university-based young adults in Dhaka, Bangladesh. During Wave 1 (September-December 2015), total 573 undergraduate students (mean age: 20.7 ± 1.35 years; 45% females) completed a self-administered survey on PA, SB, psychological distress, health and lifestyle factors and sociodemographics. During Wave 2 (October-November 2016), 395 students (retention rate = 69%) completed a sub-set of Wave 2 survey with items on PA, SB and psychological distress. PA and SB were assessed using the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire and distress with the Kessler 6 Psychological Distress scale. Generalized Estimating Equations with Gaussian family and identity link under exchangeable correlation structure was used to examine the relationships. Multivariable modeling showed that participants with insufficient PA (<150 min/week) and high SB (≥480 min/day) or insufficient PA + low SB had more distress [ß: 3.07 (95% CI: 2.12-4.01) and 2.77 (1.86-3.67), respectively] than those who had sufficient PA + low SB, after controlling for gender, sleep difficulties, perceived health, fast food and fresh fruit intake. There was no statistically significant difference for the level of distress between other PA and SB groups. In this one-year prospective study, irrespective of SB, insufficient PA was associated with high psychological distress in university-based young adults in Bangladesh. The protective role of PA should be considered in intervention programs to improve psychological health of young adults.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsychiatric Quarterly
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.keywordsExercise
dc.subject.keywordsHealth promotion
dc.subject.keywordsLongitudinal study
dc.subject.keywordsMental health
dc.subject.keywordsScreen use
dc.titleCombined Effects of Physical Inactivity and Sedentary Behaviour on Psychological Distress Among University-Based Young Adults: a One-Year Prospective Study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationUddin, R; Burton, NW; Khan, A, Combined Effects of Physical Inactivity and Sedentary Behaviour on Psychological Distress Among University-Based Young Adults: a One-Year Prospective Study., Psychiatric Quarterly, 2019
dc.date.updated2019-12-11T05:24:44Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 Springer US. This is an electronic version of an article published in American Journal of Community Psychology, pp 1–12, 2019. American Journal of Community Psychology is available online at: http://link.springer.com/ with the open URL of your article.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBurton, Nicola W.


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