Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBUCHAN, BRUCE
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-13T00:49:56Z
dc.date.available2019-12-13T00:49:56Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1479-2443
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/s1479244319000076
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/389764
dc.description.abstractThis paper will present a comparative analysis of the ethnographic writings of three colonial travellers trained in medicine at the University of Edinburgh: William Anderson (1750–78), Archibald Menzies (1754–1842) and Robert Brown (1773–1858). Each travelled widely beyond Scotland, enabling them to make a series of observations of non-European peoples in a wide variety of colonial contexts. William Anderson, Archibald Menzies and Robert Brown in particular travelled extensively in the Pacific with (respectively) James Cook on his second and third voyages (1771–8), with George Vancouver (1791–5) and with Matthew Flinders (1801–3). Together, their surviving writings from these momentous expeditions illustrate a growing interest in natural-historical explanations for diversity among human populations. Race emerged as a key concept in this quest, but it remained entangled with assumptions about the stadial historical progress or “civilization” of humanity. A comparative examination of their ethnographic writings thus presents a unique opportunity to study the complex interplay between concepts of race, savagery and civilization in the varied colonial contexts of the Scottish Enlightenment.</jats:p>
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.sponsorshipRiksbankens Jubileumsfond
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto31
dc.relation.ispartofjournalModern Intellectual History
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolitical science
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHistorical studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHistory and philosophy of specific fields
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4408
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4303
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode5002
dc.titleScottish Medical Ethnography: Colonial Travel, Stadial Theory and the Natural History of Race, c.1770-1805
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBUCHAN, B, Scottish Medical Ethnography: Colonial Travel, Stadial Theory and the Natural History of Race, c.1770-1805, Modern Intellectual History, 2019, pp. 1-31
dc.date.updated2019-12-12T01:43:00Z
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBuchan, Bruce A.


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record