Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHorstman, Nicole J
dc.contributor.authorBond, Christine EW
dc.contributor.authorEriksson, Li
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-13T00:53:38Z
dc.date.available2019-12-13T00:53:38Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0886-2605
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0886260519888533
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/389765
dc.description.abstractThis study examined public perceptions of sentencing severity for males convicted of domestic violence assault compared with non-domestic violence assault. Over the years, surveys have reported changes in community attitudes toward seeing domestic violence as a more serious issue and an increased understanding of what acts constitute a domestic violence offense (Carlson & Worden, 2005). This study aimed to (a) examine whether public perceptions of sentencing severity differ between domestic and non-domestic violence assault offenses committed under similar circumstances; and (b) whether these perceptions remain after adjusting for personal attitudes, victimization experiences, and sociodemographic factors. After reading vignette scenarios depicting domestic and non-domestic assault, 284 undergraduate students responded to a survey about their perceptions of appropriate sentence outcomes and length. Results found that regardless of participants' punitiveness (and other factors), the manipulation of the victim-offender relationship was a significant predictor for judgments of sentencing severity. Notably, the results highlighted a leniency effect in the perceptions of participants toward perpetrators of domestic violence when compared with those who received the non-domestic violence scenario. These findings imply that undergraduate students judge domestic violence as less serious and hence not warranting as severe sentencing as non-domestic violence assault perpetrators. The study indicates that public perceptions of sentencing severity for domestic violence perpetrators are not consistent with the reported shift in public perceptions toward seeing domestic violence as a serious public issue. These findings highlight the importance of continued community education about domestic violence as well as the need to take care when considering engaging public opinion in sentencing practices for domestic violence perpetrators.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSage Publications
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto24
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSocial Work
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1607
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.keywordsdomestic violence
dc.subject.keywordsperceptions of domestic violence
dc.subject.keywordsviolent offenders
dc.titleSentencing Domestic Violence Offenders: A Vignette Study of Public Perceptions
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationHorstman, NJ; Bond, CEW; Eriksson, L, Sentencing Domestic Violence Offenders: A Vignette Study of Public Perceptions., Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 2019, pp. 1-24
dc.date.updated2019-12-12T02:17:33Z
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBond, Christine E.
gro.griffith.authorEriksson, Li L.
gro.griffith.authorHorstman, Nicole


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record