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dc.contributor.authorCardell, Elizabeth A
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-02T00:08:41Z
dc.date.available2020-01-02T00:08:41Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.issn1034-912X
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10349121003751131
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/389967
dc.description.abstractThe incidence of stuttering has often been cited as being approximately 4–5% (e.g., Andrews et al., 1983; Craig, 1998; Mansson, 2000). However, a recent large-scale study found that the incidence of stuttering by age three was 8.5% (Reilly et al., 2009). Other studies that have included children who stuttered for only a short period report the incidence of stuttering to be as high as 15% (e.g., Bloodstein, 1995). While stuttering in early childhood is manifest by its speech characteristics and evaluated accordingly, up until quite recently there has been little formal consideration of the affective and emotional impact that stuttering might have on very young children (i.e., ages two to five years). Indeed, a common view was that it was only in later years, when the child had experienced multiple negative experiences, that negative attitudes and beliefs about speech were formed. It is now known that children as young as three years of age can evaluate their performance in comparison with others and, therefore, can develop feelings of embarrassment or shame about stuttered speech (Lewis, 2000).
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom236
dc.relation.ispartofpageto238
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Disability, Development and Education
dc.relation.ispartofvolume57
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation Systems
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist Studies in Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSocial Work
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1301
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1303
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1607
dc.titleCommunication Attitude Test for Preschool and Kindergarten Children who Stutter (KiddyCAT): Book Review
dc.typeJournal article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationCardell, EA, Communication Attitude Test for Preschool and Kindergarten Children who Stutter (KiddyCAT), International Journal of Disability, Development and Education, 2010, 57 (2), pp. 236-238
dc.date.updated2019-12-29T00:26:49Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorCardell, Elizabeth A.


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