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dc.contributor.authorShrestha, Nirajan
dc.contributor.authorSleep, Simone L
dc.contributor.authorCuffe, James Sm
dc.contributor.authorHolland, Olivia J
dc.contributor.authorPerkins, Anthony V
dc.contributor.authorYu Yau, Suk
dc.contributor.authorMcAinch, Andrew J
dc.contributor.authorHryciw, Deanne H
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-07T00:33:55Z
dc.date.available2020-01-07T00:33:55Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1440-1681
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1440-1681.13244
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/390066
dc.description.abstractMaternal nutrition plays a critical role in fetal development and can influence adult onset of disease. Linoleic acid (LA) and alpha- linolenic acid (ALA) are major omega-6 (n-6) and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), respectively, that are essential in our diet. LA and ALA are critical for the development of the fetal neurological and immune systems. However, in recent years, the consumption of n-6 PUFA has increased gradually worldwide, and elevated n-6 PUFA consumption may be harmful to human health. Consumption of diets with high levels of n-6 PUFA before or during pregnancy may have detrimental effects on fetal development, and may influence overall health of offspring in adulthood. This review discusses the role of n-6 PUFA in fetal programming, the importance of a balance between n-6 and n-3 PUFAs in the maternal diet, and the need of further animal models and human studies that critically evaluate both n-6 and n-3 PUFA content in diets.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.sponsorshipAllen Foundation Inc
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley Blackwell
dc.relation.ispartofjournalClinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPaediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhysiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical Physiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1114
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0606
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1115
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1116
dc.subject.keywordsEssential fatty acid
dc.subject.keywordsfetal programming
dc.subject.keywordslinoleic acid
dc.subject.keywordsmaternal nutrition
dc.subject.keywordssex ratio
dc.titleRole OfOmega‐6 and Omega‐3 fatty acids in fetal programming
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dcterms.bibliographicCitationShrestha, N; Sleep, SL; Cuffe, JS; Holland, OJ; Perkins, AV; Yu Yau, S; McAinch, AJ; Hryciw, DH, Role OfOmega-6 and Omega-3 fatty acids in fetal programming, Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, 2019
dc.date.updated2020-01-05T23:23:44Z
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version
gro.rights.copyright© 2019 The Authors and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Role OfOmega‐6 and Omega‐3 fatty acids in fetal programming, Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, 2019, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/1440-1681.13244. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
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gro.griffith.authorShrestha, Nirajan
gro.griffith.authorCuffe, James S.
gro.griffith.authorHolland, Olivia J.
gro.griffith.authorPerkins, Anthony V.
gro.griffith.authorSleep, Simone L.
gro.griffith.authorHryciw, D
gro.griffith.authorSkelly, Deanne


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